gone

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See also: góneʼ

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English gon, igon, gan, ȝegan, from Old English gān, ġegān, from Proto-Germanic *gānaz (gone), past participle of *gāną (to go). Cognate with West Germanic Scots gane (gone), West Frisian gien (gone), Low German gahn (gone), and Dutch gegaan (gone).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

gone

  1. past participle of go
  2. Alternative spelling of gon or gon': short for gonna, going to.
    • 2006, Noire [pseudonym], Thug-A-Licious: An Urban Erotic Tale, New York, N.Y.: One World, Ballantine Books, →ISBN, page 24:
      Take or be taken. Get yours or get got. It was the code of the streets and I'd lived by it. The way things was looking, I was prolly gone die by it too.

Adjective[edit]

gone (comparative further gone or goner, superlative furthest gone or gonest)

  1. Away, having left.
    Are they gone already?
  2. No longer existing, having passed.
    The days of my youth are gone.
    All the little shops that used to be here are now gone.
  3. Used up.
    I'm afraid all the coffee's gone at the moment.
    The bulb's gone, can you put a new one in?.
  4. Dead.
    • 1837, L[etitia] E[lizabeth] L[andon], “The Marriage”, in Ethel Churchill: Or, The Two Brides. [], volume I, London: Henry Colburn, [], →OCLC, page 221:
      Dust, that a breath could blow aside, yet that was once, like ourselves, animate with hope, passion, and sorrow, is below; around are the vain memorials of human grief and human pride; yet all alike dedicated to the gone.
  5. Doomed, done for.
    Have you seen the company's revenue? It's through the floor. They're gone.
  6. (colloquial) Not fully aware of one's surroundings, often through intoxication or mental decline.
    Don't bother trying to understand what Grandma says; she's gone.
    • 1991, Stephen Fry, The Liar, London: Heinemann, →OCLC, page 28:
      [] she put on a kind of sing-song voice whenever she was pissed, it was one of the signs that she was really gone []
  7. (slang) Entirely given up to; infatuated with; used with on.
    He's totally gone on her.
  8. (informal, US, dated) Excellent, wonderful; crazy.
    It was a group of real gone cats.
    • 1957, Jack Kerouac, chapter 11, in On the Road, Penguin, published 1976, →OCLC, part 1, page 61:
      “All right, all right, don’t drop your gold all over the place. I have found the gonest little girl in the world and I am going straight to the Lion’s Den with her tonight.”
    • 1975, Garry Marshall et al., “Richie's Flip Side”, in Happy Days, season 2, episode 21, spoken by Richie Cunningham (Ron Howard):
      Dad, I want to be a jock. All a jock needs is some hep patter and a real gone image. Now, they just don't teach that jazz in college.
  9. (archaic) Ago (used post-positionally).
    • 1999, George R.R. Martin, A Clash of Kings, Bantam, published 2011, page 491:
      Six nights gone, your brother fell upon my uncle Stafford, encamped with his host at a village called Oxcross not three days ride from Casterly Rock.
  10. (US) Weak; faint; feeling a sense of goneness.
  11. Of an arrow: wide of the mark.
  12. Used with a duration to indicate for how long a process has been developing, an action has been performed or a state has persisted; pregnant.
    She’s three months gone

Translations[edit]

Preposition[edit]

gone

  1. (Britain, informal) Past, after, later than (a time).
    You'd better hurry up, it's gone four o'clock.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • gone”, in OneLook Dictionary Search.

Anagrams[edit]

Fijian[edit]

Noun[edit]

gone

  1. child

French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Apparently from Franco-Provençal gonet.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gone m (plural gones)

  1. (Lyon dialect) kid (child)
    Synonyms: enfant, gosse

Further reading[edit]

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English guma.

Noun[edit]

gone

  1. Alternative form of gome (man)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English gān, ġegān.

Verb[edit]

gone

  1. Alternative form of gon (gone)

Plautdietsch[edit]

Verb[edit]

gone (3rd person present jeit, past jinkj, past participle jegone)

  1. to walk
  2. to go, to move
  3. to proceed
  4. (baking, of dough) to rise

Yola[edit]

Verb[edit]

gone

  1. present participle of goe
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY:
      Gone to glaade.
      After it is set.

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 42