puta

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish puta.

Noun[edit]

puta (uncountable)

  1. (vulgar, chiefly US Hispanic) A prostitute, whore, slut, bitch, etc.
    • 1988, February 12, “Lawrence Bommer”, in Extremeties/Talking With . . .[1]:
      Mastrosimone's (antiheroine?) Marjorie lets in a man who quickly drops the small talk, slams her to the floor, and almost smothers her with a pillow as he commands her to say "thank you," "I love you," and "I am your puta."
    • 2005, Eric Bogosian, Wasted Beauty, page 63:
      And we told you, man, we have not seen your puta sister.

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Noun[edit]

puta f (plural putes)

  1. whore (prostitute)

Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

puta f (plural putes)

  1. (derogatory, vulgar) prostitute, whore, slut
  2. mischievous

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Cebuano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish puta.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: pu‧ta

Noun[edit]

puta

  1. (derogatory, vulgar) a prostitute
  2. (derogatory, vulgar) a slut
  3. (derogatory, vulgar) a bitch

Synonyms[edit]


French[edit]

Probably borrowed from Spanish puta. It appeared first in rap texts.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

puta f (plural putas)

  1. (slang, derogatory, vulgar) bitch
    • 2019, Ninho (lyrics and music), “Maman ne le sait pas”, performed by Ninho:
      Dans la ville j'revends le cannabis, maman ne le sait pas
      J’recompte mes potes, tout près des haramistes, le canon d'vant la glace
      Les pneus qui crissent, on est revenus tirer sur ces fils de puta
      Et j'sais qu’Iblis veut pas m'voir m'en tirer, faut qu'j'm'éloigne de tout ça
      In the city I'm selling the cannabis, mama don't know it
      I'm counting my buddies, close to the haramists, the gun in front of the ice
      The tyres squealing, we're back to shoot those sons of bitches
      And I know Iblis don't want me to get away with it, I gotta get away from it all
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
  2. (slang, derogatory, vulgar) whore
  3. (slang, derogatory, vulgar) slut

Synonyms[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese puta, probably from Vulgar Latin *putta, variant of puta, female form of puttus, putus (boy).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

puta f (plural putas)

  1. (vulgar, derogatory) whore
    Synonym: prostituta
  2. (vulgar, derogatory) slut
    • 1459, Anselmo López Carreira (ed.), Fragmentos de notarios, doc. 164;
      Iten Costança de Riba davia diso porlo dito juramento que feito avya que lle oyra diser que disera a dita Costança Vasques que era huna puta que posera as cornas ao marido
      Item, Constanza de Ribadavia said, by that oath that she had done, that she heard that said Constanza Vázquez was a slut that had put horns on her husband
  3. (vulgar, derogatory) bitch

Derived terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

puta m or f (plural putas)

  1. (vulgar) evil; inmoral
  2. (vulgar) an intensifier used in a similar way as fucking, freaking or damn may be used in the USA. May mean "huge", "impressive" and/or "problematic" and can even be used in a good way, if the person is jealous
    Non puiden ir alá por causa dunha puta tormenta.I could not go there, because of a fucking storm.
    Tes unha puta sorte!You're so freaking lucky! / You're so freaking unlucky!

References[edit]

  • puta” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2012.
  • puta” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006–2016.
  • puta” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • puta” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • puta” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Interlingua[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Italian puttana, French putain, Spanish puta, and Portuguese puta.

Noun[edit]

puta (plural putas)

  1. (vulgar) whore

Synonyms[edit]


Kabuverdianu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese puta.

Noun[edit]

puta

  1. (slang) whore, slut, prostitute
  2. (slang) bitch

Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Imperative of putō (think, consider, prune, trim).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

putā

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of putō (think!)

Etymology 2[edit]

Lexicalisation of the above imperative that underwent iambic shortening.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

puta (not comparable)

  1. suppose, for instance, namely
    Synonyms: ut puta, ecce puta, ecce, exemplī grātiā

Etymology 3[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

puta

  1. inflection of putus:
    1. nominative/vocative feminine singular
    2. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter plural

Adjective[edit]

putā

  1. ablative feminine singular of putus

Lithuanian[edit]

Noun[edit]

puta f

  1. foam

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from East Central German or German Pute.

Noun[edit]

puta f

  1. (female) turkey (bird)
  2. turkey (meat)
Declension[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

puta

  1. (dialectal) Alternative form of pyta

References[edit]

  • Starosta, Manfred (1999), “puta”, in Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch (in German), Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag

Maori[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Polynesian *puta. Compare Hawaiian puka.

Noun[edit]

puta

  1. hole
  2. anus

Verb[edit]

puta

  1. to pass through and out
  2. to graduate
  3. to run off; to escape
  4. to be born

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

puta f sg

  1. definite feminine singular of pute

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Noun[edit]

puta f sg

  1. definite singular of pute

Papiamentu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish puta and Portuguese puta and Kabuverdianu puta.

Noun[edit]

puta

  1. (slang) (vulgar) whore, slut, prostitute
  2. (slang) (vulgar) bitch

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Uncertain. Possibly related to Italian puttana (Old Spanish putaña; see putañear), which ultimately derives from Latin putus (boy). María Moliner dictionary (also Joan Coromines[1]) states the most probable origin: from Vulgar Latin putta, variant of puta, female form of puttus, putus (boy). Note that this word appears in all Romance languages.

Noun[edit]

puta f (plural putas)

  1. (vulgar, derogatory) prostitute, whore, hooker
  2. (vulgar, derogatory) slut (promiscuous woman)

Adjective[edit]

puta (plural, comparable)

  1. feminine singular of puto
  2. (vulgar, derogatory, of a girl or woman) promiscuous
  3. (only in some cities in Brazil, vulgar, also in Portugal) an intensifier used in a similar way as fucking, frigging or damn may be used in the USA. May mean "huge", "impressive" and/or "problematic" and can even be used in a good way if the person is jealous
    Synonyms: baita, gaita
    Não pude ir lá porque tinha uma puta tempestade.I could not go there, because there was a huge fucking storm.
    Você tem uma puta sorte.You're so frigging lucky.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Coromines, Joan (2011) Breve diccionario etimológico de la lengua castellana [Brief etymological dictionary of the Spanish language] (in Spanish), Madrid: Gredos, →ISBN

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Noun[edit]

puta m sg

  1. genitive singular of put

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
puta phuta
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Genitive singular form of pȗt (road, path, way), but used in plural constructions as an alternative form of the adverb pȗt (time).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /pǔːtaː/
  • Hyphenation: pu‧ta

Adverb[edit]

pútā (Cyrillic spelling пу́та̄)

  1. times (in combination with cardinals greater than or equal to two, and other words indicating quantity, specifying how many times has the action been repeated)
    dva putatwice
    pet putafive times
    nekoliko putaseveral times
    mnogo putamany times
    idućeg putanext time
    ovog putathis time
    svakog putaevery time
  2. times (indicating multiplication)
    dva puta dvatwo times two
Related terms[edit]
  • (adverbial sense): pȗt

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old High German puttina.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /pûta/
  • Hyphenation: pu‧ta

Noun[edit]

pȕta f (Cyrillic spelling пу̏та)

  1. (regional) wooden dish or plate (usually made by a cooper)
Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

puta (Cyrillic spelling пута)

  1. inflection of puto:
    1. genitive singular
    2. nominative/genitive/accusative/vocative plural

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Uncertain. Possibly related to Italian puttana (Old Spanish putaña; see putañear), which ultimately derives from Latin putus (boy). María Moliner dictionary (also Joan Coromines[1]) states the most probable origin: from Vulgar Latin putta, variant of puta, female form of puttus, putus (boy). Note that this word appears in all Romance languages.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈputa/, [ˈpu.t̪a]
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

puta

  1. feminine singular of puto

Noun[edit]

puta f (plural putas)

  1. (derogatory, vulgar) whore, slut, prostitute
    Synonyms: golfa, maraca, prostituta, ramera
  2. (derogatory, vulgar) bitch
    Synonym: zorra

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Cebuano: puta
  • English: puta
  • Tagalog: puta

References[edit]

  1. ^ Joan Coromines, Breve diccionario etimológico de la lengua castellana, tercera edición 2011, →ISBN

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

puta (present putar, preterite putade, supine putat, imperative puta)

  1. to pout (one's lips)

Conjugation[edit]


Tagalog[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish puta.

Noun[edit]

puta

  1. prostitute
  2. (derogatory, vulgar) Term of abuse: bitch

Interjection[edit]

puta

  1. (vulgar, derogatory, colloquial) Said in dismay or discontent.

Usage notes[edit]

The Commision on the Filipino Language treats this as the neutral word for a prostitute, but the English term is often used in its place due to its roots as a Spanish vulgarity.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Further reading[edit]