remark

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See also: re-mark

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French remarquer, from re- (again) + marquer (to mark); see mark.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

remark (countable and uncountable, plural remarks)

  1. An act of pointing out or noticing; notice or observation.
  2. An expression, in speech or writing, of something remarked or noticed; a mention of something
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 3, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      One saint's day in mid-term a certain newly appointed suffragan-bishop came to the school chapel, and there preached on “The Inner Life.”  He at once secured attention by his informal method, and when presently the coughing of Jarvis […] interrupted the sermon, he altogether captivated his audience with a remark about cough lozenges being cheap and easily procurable.
    • 1844, Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit
      But the journey might have been one of several hours’ duration, without provoking a remark from either; for it was clear that Jonas did not mean to break the silence which prevailed between them, and that it was not, as yet, his dear friend’s cue to tempt them into conversation.
    make a remark
    pass a remark
    a biting remark
    a funny remark
    a spoken remark
  3. A casual observation, comment, or statement
    • 2014, Stephen King, Mr. Mercedes: A Novel
      He remembers something Pete Huntley said at lunch, just a remark in passing, and the answer comes to him.
  4. (engraving) Alternative form of remarque
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Verb[edit]

remark (third-person singular simple present remarks, present participle remarking, simple past and past participle remarked)

  1. (intransitive) To make a remark or remarks; to comment.
  2. (transitive) To express in words or writing; to state; to make a comment
    He remarked that it was getting late.
    • 1904, Elma MacGibbon, Leaves of Knowledge
      He looked at me with pity, which caused me to smile, remarking that I had noticed that here and elsewhere in the east, the heroes had monuments or statues erected to their memory []
  3. (transitive) To pay heed to; notice; to take notice of
    • 1886, Robert Louis Stephenson, The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde:
      "Did you ever remark that door?" he asked; and when his companion had replied in the affirmative, "It is connect in my mind," added he, "with a very odd story."
    • 1889 January 3, Antoine D'Abbadie, in a letter to the editor of Nature, volume 39, pages 247-248:
      When travelling in Spain, Willkomm remarked qobar at a distance of 3 or 4 miles, yet, on reaching the actual spot, he saw nothing.
    • 1986, John le Carré, A Perfect Spy:
      “Let's just be grateful he's alive,” said Kate, and several heads turned sharply, remarking this unaccustomed display of feeling from a Fifth Floor lady.
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To mark in a notable manner; to distinguish clearly; to make noticeable or conspicuous; to point out.
    • 1633, John Ford, Tis Pity She's a Whore
      Thou art a man remark'd to taste a mischief.
    • 1671, John Milton, Samson Agonistes
      His manacles remark him; there he sits.
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

re- +‎ mark

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

remark (plural remarks)

  1. Alternative spelling of re-mark

Verb[edit]

remark (third-person singular simple present remarks, present participle remarking, simple past and past participle remarked)

  1. Alternative spelling of re-mark

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]