scarlet

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See also: Scarlet and Scarlett

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

Old French escarlate (a type of cloth), from Medieval Latin scarlatum (scarlet cloth), from Persian سقرلات (saqerlât, a warm woollen cloth), of uncertain origin.

Noun[edit]

scarlet (plural scarlets)

  1. A bright red, slightly orange colour.
    scarlet colour:  
  2. Cloth of a scarlet color.
    • Bible, Proverbs xxxi. 21
      All her household are clothed with scarlet.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Adjective[edit]

scarlet (comparative more scarlet, superlative most scarlet)

  1. Of a bright red colour.
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter V, in The Younger Set (Project Gutenberg; EBook #14852), New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, published 1 February 2005 (Project Gutenberg version), OCLC 24962326:
      Breezes blowing from beds of iris quickened her breath with their perfume; she saw the tufted lilacs sway in the wind, and the streamers of mauve-tinted wistaria swinging, all a-glisten with golden bees; she saw a crimson cardinal winging through the foliage, and amorous tanagers flashing like scarlet flames athwart the pines.
  2. Sinful or whorish.
    a scarlet woman

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

scarlet (third-person singular simple present scarlets, present participle scarleting, simple past and past participle scarleted)

  1. To dye or tinge with scarlet.
    • Ford
      The ashy paleness of my cheek / Is scarleted in ruddy flakes of wrath.

Anagrams[edit]