sortir

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Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan (compare Occitan sortir), from Latin sortīrī (to select) (present active infinitive of sortior), probably influenced by surrectus (through a Vulgar Latin form *surctus and its derivatives, possibly through a verb *surrectīre, surctīre; cf. also Old Catalan surt, surta).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

sortir (first-person singular present surto, past participle sortit)

  1. to go out, to leave
    Synonyms: marxar, eixir (chiefly Valencian)
    Antonym: entrar
  2. to go out (to leave one's abode to go to public places, especially for recreation or entertainment)
  3. to come out, to appear, to emerge
    Synonyms: aparèixer, emergir
  4. to come out, to be published, to be made known
  5. to end up, to turn out
    sortirto come out well

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Franco-Provençal[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sortīrī (to select) (present active infinitive of sortior), probably influenced by surrectus (through a Vulgar Latin form *surctus and its derivatives, possibly through a verb *surrectīre, surctīre). Compare French sortir, Italian sortire, compare also Spanish surtir.

Verb[edit]

sortir

  1. (intransitive) to exit, go out, come out
  2. (transitive) to take out, bring out

Conjugation[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French, from Latin sortīrī, present active infinitive of sortior, probably influenced by surrectus (through a Vulgar Latin form *surctus and its derivatives, possibly through a verb *surrectīre, surctīre). Compare Italian sortire, compare also Spanish surtir.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /sɔʁ.tiʁ/
  • (file)

Verb[edit]

sortir

  1. (intransitive) to exit, go out, come out
    Je suis sorti de l'école.I came out of school.
  2. (transitive) to take out, bring out

Usage notes[edit]

  • This verb uses the auxiliary verb avoir when used transitively (or with a transitive sense, even when the complement is omitted); otherwise (when it is intransitive), it uses être.

Conjugation[edit]

This is one of a fairly large group of irregular -ir verbs that are all conjugated the same way. Other members of this group include partir and dormir. The most significant difference between these verbs' conjugation and that of the regular -ir verbs is that these verbs' conjugation does not use the infix -iss-. Further, this conjugation has the forms (je, tu) sors and (il) sort in the present indicative and imperative, whereas a regular -ir verb would have *sortis and *sortit (as in the past historic).

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Noun[edit]

sortir m (plural sortirs)

  1. end, closing
    Au sortir du printemps
    At the closing of spring

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Norman[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French, from Latin sortīrī, present active infinitive of sortior, probably influenced by surrectus (through a Vulgar Latin form *surctus and its derivatives, possibly through a verb *surrectīre, surctīre).

Verb[edit]

sortir

  1. (Guernsey) to go out

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sortīrī, present active infinitive of sortior, probably influenced by surrectus (through a Vulgar Latin form *surctus and its derivatives, possibly through a verb *surrectīre, surctīre). Compare Italian sortire, French sortir.

Verb[edit]

sortir

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Puter, Vallader) to exit