wis

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: -wis and Wis.

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English wis ‎(certain, sure), from an aphetic form of Middle English iwis, ywis ‎(certain, sure) (from Old English ġewiss ‎(certain, sure)), or of North Germanic origin, akin to Icelandic viss ‎(certain). More at ywis.

Adverb[edit]

wis ‎(comparative more wis, superlative most wis)

  1. (rare, obsolete or dialectal) Certainly, surely
    • 1884, Charlotte Mary Yonge, The armourer's prentices:
      So I wis would the Dragon under him [...]
  2. (rare, obsolete or dialectal) Really, truly
  3. (rare, obsolete or dialectal) Indeed
    "As wis God helpe me." --Chaucer.

Adjective[edit]

wis ‎(comparative more wis, superlative most wis)

  1. (rare, obsolete or dialectal) Certain
  2. (rare, obsolete or dialectal) Sure
    He was wis on his word
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From an incorrect division, mistaking iwis ‎(certain) for I wis ‎(I know). See ywis for more information. The German verb wissen appears similar, but in fact corresponds etymologically to the English verb wit; both of those verbs are only indirectly related to this one.

Verb[edit]

wis ‎(third-person singular simple present wis, present participle -, simple past -, past participle wist or wissed)

  1. (obsolete or archaic) To know.
  2. (obsolete or archaic) To think, suppose.
    "Howe'er you wis." --R. Browning.
  3. (obsolete or archaic) To imagine, ween; to deem.
    Nor do I know how long it is (For I have lain entranced, I wis). --Coleridge.

Afrikaans[edit]

Verb[edit]

wis

  1. preterite of weet; knew

Chuukese[edit]

Noun[edit]

wis

  1. duty, responsibility

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

wis ‎(not comparable)

  1. sure, certain
    een wisse dood — a certain death

Declension[edit]

Inflection of wis
uninflected wis
inflected wisse
comparative
positive
predicative/adverbial wis
indefinite m./f. sing. wisse
n. sing. wis
plural wisse
definite wisse
partitive wis

Noun[edit]

wis f, m ‎(plural wissen, diminutive wisje n)

  1. twig
  2. bundle, bunch
  3. short for wisdoek (dishcloth)

Verb[edit]

wis

  1. first-person singular present indicative of wissen
  2. imperative of wissen

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

wis

  1. Romanization of 𐍅𐌹𐍃

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wīsaz, from Proto-Indo-European *weydstos ‎(knowledgeable), an extension of Proto-Indo-European *weyd- ‎(to see, to know). Akin to Old English wīs, Old High German wīs and Old Norse víss.

Adjective[edit]

wīs

  1. wise

Declension[edit]


Descendants[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wīsaz, from Proto-Indo-European *weydstos ‎(knowledgeable), an extension of Proto-Indo-European *weyd- ‎(to see, to know). Akin to Old High German wīs and Old Norse víss.

Adjective[edit]

wīs

  1. wise

Declension[edit]

Weak Strong
case singular plural case singular plural
m n f m n f m n f
nominative wīsa wīse wīse wīsan nom. wīs wīse wīs wīsa, -e
accusative wīsan wīse wīsan acc. wīsne wīs wīse wīse wīs wīsa, -e
genitive wīsan wīsra, wīsena gen. wīses wīses wīsre wīsra
dative wīsan wīsum dat. wīsum wīsum wīsre wīsum
instrumental wīse

Descendants[edit]


Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wīsaz, from Proto-Indo-European *weydstos ‎(knowledgeable), an extension of Proto-Indo-European *weyd- ‎(to see, to know). Akin to Old English wīs and Old Norse víss.

Adjective[edit]

wīs

  1. wise

Descendants[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wīsaz, from Proto-Indo-European *weydstos ‎(knowledgeable), an extension of Proto-Indo-European *weyd- ‎(to see, to know). Akin to Old English wīs, Old High German wīs and Old Norse víss.

Adjective[edit]

wīs

  1. wise

Declension[edit]



Scots[edit]

Verb[edit]

wis

  1. simple past tense of be

Usage notes[edit]

Use wis with singular pronouns & plural nouns, otherwise use wis or wir with plural pronouns.

See also[edit]