leer

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See also: Leer and lêer

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Exact development uncertain, but apparently from *leer (to make a face), from leer (face). See below.

Verb[edit]

leer (third-person singular simple present leers, present participle leering, simple past and past participle leered)

  1. (intransitive) To look sideways or obliquely; now especially with sexual desire or malicious intent.
  2. (transitive) To entice with a leer or leers.
    • (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)
      To gild a face with smiles; and leer a man to ruin.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

leer (plural leers)

  1. A significant side glance; a glance expressive of some passion, as malignity, amorousness, etc.; a sly or lecherous look.
  2. An arch or affected glance or cast of countenance.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English ler, leor (face, cheek), from Old English hlēor (face, cheek, profile), from Proto-Germanic *hleuzą (ear, cheek), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱlews- (temple of the forehead, cheek), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱlewe-, *ḱlew- (to hear). Cognate with Scots lire, lere (face, appearance, complexion, blee), Dutch lier (cheek), Swedish lyra (pout), Norwegian lia (hillside), Icelandic hlýr (the face, cheek, countenance). Related to Old English hlyst (sense of hearing, listening) and hlysnan (to listen). More at list, listen.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

leer (plural leers)

  1. (obsolete) The cheek.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Holinshed to this entry?)
  2. (obsolete) The face.
  3. (obsolete) One's appearance; countenance.
    • Shakespeare
      a Rosalind of a better leer than you
  4. (obsolete) Complexion; hue; blee; colour.
  5. (obsolete) Flesh; skin.
  6. (UK dialectal) The flank or loin.

Anagrams[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English lere, from Old English ġelǣre, *lǣre (empty, void, empty-handed), from Proto-Germanic *lēziz, *lēzijaz (empty), from Proto-Indo-European *les- (to collect, pick). Cognate with Dutch laar (a clearing in the woods), German leer (empty). Related to Old English lesan (to gather, collect). More at lease.

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

leer (comparative more leer, superlative most leer)

  1. Empty; unoccupied; clear.
    a leer stomach
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Gifford to this entry?)
  2. Destitute; lacking; wanting.
  3. Faint from lack of food; hungry.
  4. (UK dialectal) Thin; faint.
  5. Having no load or burden; free; without a rider.
    a leer horse
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ben Jonson to this entry?)
  6. Lacking sense or seriousness; trifling; frivolous.
    leer words

Etymology 4[edit]

From Middle English leren, from Old English lǣran (to teach, instruct, guide, enjoin, advise, persuade, urge, preach, hand down), from Proto-Germanic *laizijaną (to teach), from Proto-Indo-European *leis- (track, footprint, furrow, trace). Cognate with Dutch leren (to teach), German lehren (to teach), Swedish lära (to teach). Related to Old English lār (lore, learning, science, art of teaching, preaching, doctrine, study, precept, exhortation, advice, instigation, history, story, cunning ). See lore.

Verb[edit]

leer (third-person singular simple present leers, present participle leering, simple past and past participle leered)

  1. (transitive) To teach.
  2. (transitive) To learn.

Etymology 5[edit]

See lehr

Noun[edit]

leer (plural leers)

  1. Alternative form of lehr

Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Dutch leren.

Verb[edit]

leer (present leer, present participle lerende, past participle geleer)

  1. to learn

Etymology 2[edit]

From Dutch leer.

Noun[edit]

leer (plural lere)

  1. (countable) leather
  2. (uncountable) teaching

Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

leer c

  1. plural indefinite of le

Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *leþrą.

Noun[edit]

leer n (plural leren, diminutive leertje n)

  1. leather
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Dutch lēra, from Proto-Germanic *laizō, from *laizijaną. Compare German Lehre, English lore.

Noun[edit]

leer f, m (plural leren, diminutive leertje n)

  1. teachings
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

leer

  1. first-person singular present indicative of leren
  2. imperative of leren

Anagrams[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Noun[edit]

leer (genitive leeri, partitive leeri)

  1. camp

Declension[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old High German lāri

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

leer (comparative leerer, superlative am leersten)

  1. empty

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

leer

  1. Imperative singular of leeren.
  2. (colloquial)First-person singular present of leeren.

External links[edit]

  • leer in Duden online

Norwegian[edit]

Verb[edit]

leer

  1. Present tense of lee

Romansch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin aēr, with the initial 'l' added from a preceding definite article.

Noun[edit]

leer m

  1. (Sutsilvan) air

Synonyms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran) aria
  • (Puter, Vallader) ajer

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin legere, present active infinitive of legō. Compare English legible.

Verb[edit]

leer (first-person singular present leo, first-person singular preterite leí, past participle leído)

  1. to read
    • 1605, Miguel de Cervantes, El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha, Primera parte, Capítulo I
      [] y llegó a tanto su curiosidad y desatino en esto, que vendió muchas hanegas de tierra de sembradura para comprar libros de caballerías en que leer, y, así, llevó a su casa todos cuantos pudo haber dellos.
      [] to such a pitch did his eagerness and infatuation go that he sold many an acre of tillageland to buy books of chivalry to read, and brought home as many of them as he could get.
    Quiero leer el periódico.
    I want to read the newspaper.

Conjugation[edit]

  • Rule: i becomes y before o or e;

Related terms[edit]