tale

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See also: talé and Tale

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English, from Old English talu (tale, series, calculation, list, statement, deposition, relation, communication, narrative, fable, story, accusation, action at law), from Proto-Germanic *talō (calculation, number), from Proto-Indo-European *del- (to reckon, count). Cognate with Dutch taal (language, speech), German Zahl (number, figure), Danish tale (speech), Icelandic tala (speech, talk, discourse, number, figure), Latin dolus (guile, deceit, fraud), Ancient Greek [script?] (dólos, wile, bait), Albanian dalloj (to distinguish, tell), Kurdish til (finger), Old Armenian տող (toł, row). Related to tell, talk.

Noun[edit]

tale (plural tales)

  1. (obsolete) Number.
  2. (obsolete) Account; estimation; regard; heed.
  3. (obsolete) Speech; language.
  4. (obsolete) A speech; a statement; talk; conversation; discourse.
  5. (law, obsolete) A count; declaration.
  6. (rare or archaic) Numbering; enumeration; reckoning; account; count.
    • John Dryden
      Both number twice a day the milky dams; And once she takes the tale of all the lambs.
  7. (rare or archaic) A number of things considered as an aggregate; sum.
  8. (rare or archaic) A report of any matter; a relation; a version.
  9. An account of an asserted fact or circumstance; a rumour; a report, especially an idle or malicious story; a piece of gossip or slander; a lie.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 7, The Mirror and the Lamp:
      “A very welcome, kind, useful present, that means to the parish. By the way, Hopkins, let this go no further. We don't want the tale running round that a rich person has arrived. Churchill, my dear fellow, we have such greedy sharks, and wolves in lamb's clothing. […]”
    Don't tell tales!
  10. A rehearsal of what has occurred; narrative; discourse; statement; history; story.
    the Canterbury Tales
  11. A number told or counted off; a reckoning by count; an enumeration.
    • Hooker
      the ignorant, [] who measure by tale, and not by weight
    • Milton
      And every shepherd tells his tale, / Under the hawthorn in the dale.
    • Carew
      In packing, they keep a just tale of the number.
    • 1843 Thomas Carlyle, Past and Present, book 2, ch. 5, Twelfth Century
      They proceeded with some rigour, these Custodiars; took written inventories, clapt-on seals, exacted everywhere strict tale and measure
  12. (slang) The fraudulent opportunity presented by a confidence man to the mark (sense 3.3) of a confidence game.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English talen, from Old English talian (to count, calculate, reckon, account, consider, think, esteem, value, argue, tell, relate, impute, assign), from Proto-Germanic *talōną (to count), from Proto-Indo-European *del- (to count, reckon, aim, calculate, adjust). Cognate with German zählen (to count, number, reckon), Swedish tala (to speak, talk), Icelandic tala (to talk).

Verb[edit]

tale (third-person singular simple present tales, present participle taling, simple past and past participle taled)

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) To speak; discourse; tell tales.
  2. (dialectal, chiefly Scotland) To reckon; consider (someone) to have something.

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

tale (plural tales)

  1. Alternative form of tael.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tale

  1. plural form of taal

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse tala

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /taːlə/, [ˈtˢæːlə]

Noun[edit]

tale c (singular definite talen, plural indefinite taler)

  1. speech, talk, address, discourse

Inflection[edit]

Verb[edit]

tale (imperative tal, infinitive at tale, present tense taler, past tense talte, past participle har talt)

  1. To make a speech
  2. speak, talk

French[edit]

Verb[edit]

tale

  1. first-person singular present indicative of taler
  2. third-person singular present indicative of taler
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of taler
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of taler
  5. second-person singular imperative of taler

Anagrams[edit]


Ido[edit]

Adverb[edit]

tale

  1. hence

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin tālis.

Adjective[edit]

tale m, f (masculine and feminine plural tali)

  1. such

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Kurdish[edit]

Noun[edit]

tale ?

  1. happiness

Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

tāle

  1. vocative singular of tālus

Limburgish[edit]

Noun[edit]

tale

  1. languages

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *tala, from Proto-Germanic *talō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tale f

  1. spoken or written words, that which someone says
  2. language

Descendants[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

tale m (definite singular talen, indefinite plural taler, definite plural talene)

  1. Speech, talk, address, discourse

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

tale (present tense taler; past tense talte; past participle talt)

  1. make a speech
  2. speak, talk

Derived terms[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

tale

  1. feminine plural form of tău
    fiicele tale îmi spuneau despre casa voastră nouă
    your daughters were telling me about your new house.
  2. neuter plural form of tău

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

tale

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of talar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of talar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of talar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of talar.