datum

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: dátum and Datum

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin datum (a given).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈdeɪtʌm/, /ˈdɑːtʌm/

Noun[edit]

datum (plural data or datums)

  1. (plural: data) A measurement of something on a scale understood by both the recorder (a person or device) and the reader (another person or device). The scale is arbitrarily defined, such as from 1 to 10 by ones, 1 to 100 by 0.1, or simply true or false, on or off, yes, no, or maybe, etc.
  2. (plural: data) (philosophy) A fact known from direct observation.
  3. (plural: data) (philosophy) A premise from which conclusions are drawn.
  4. (plural: datums) (cartography, engineering) A fixed reference point, or a coordinate system.
    • 2007, Roger F Tomlinson, Thinking about GIS: geographic information system planning for managers
      Datums are another important map aspect related to projection. A datum provides a base reference for measuring locations on Earth's surface.

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

datum (third-person singular simple present datums, present participle datuming, simple past and past participle datumed)

  1. To provide missing data points by using a mathematical model to extrapolate values that are outside the range of a measuring device.
    • 1982, Paul M. Tucker, Pitfalls Revisited - Issue 3, ISBN 0931830249, page 6:
      Removing the effects of any period of deformation by datuming or flattening selective reflection horizons should restore the structure prior to the datumed horizon, or the amount of deformation above the datumed horizon.
    • 1998, Stuart Fagin, Model-based Depth Imaging, ISBN 1560800852, page 164:
      On the left the stacking velocity functions are datumed to sea level and show great disparity.
    • 2014, Hua-Wei Zhou -, Practical Seismic Data Analysis, ISBN 0521199107, page 62:
      On the other hand, if we have a sufficiently accurate near-surface velocity model, we may apply wavefield datuming to convert the raw data into new data as if they were recorded along a datum below the near surface (Box 2.3).

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]


Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

datum n

  1. date (point in time)

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • datum in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • datum in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch datum, from Latin datum (given, past participle) (from the practice of signing letters in Latin by noting the date on which they were dispatched). Compare English date.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

datum m (plural datums or data, diminutive datumpje n)

  1. date (point in time)

Usage notes[edit]

Datum is one of the few Dutch words ending on -um that does not have a neutral gender.

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

datum n (plural data, diminutive datumpje n)

  1. datum (piece of information)
    Synonyms: gegeven

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Neuter past participle of .

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

datum n (genitive datī); second declension

  1. gift, present
    • c. 254 BCE – 184 BCE, Plautus, Asinaria 56
      Quia non suppetunt dictis data.
      Because his gifts do not match his words.

Inflection[edit]

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative datum data
genitive datī datōrum
dative datō datīs
accusative datum data
ablative datō datīs
vocative datum data

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Verb[edit]

datum

  1. supine of

Participle[edit]

datum

  1. nominative neuter singular of datus
  2. accusative masculine singular of datus
  3. accusative neuter singular of datus
  4. vocative neuter singular of datus

References[edit]

  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “datum”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • datum in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]
  • datum in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • datum in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin datum.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dǎːtum/
  • Hyphenation: da‧tum

Noun[edit]

dátum m (Cyrillic spelling да́тум)

  1. date (as in day, month, and year)

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • datum” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Slovene[edit]

Slovene Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sl

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dátum m inan (genitive dátuma, nominative plural dátumi)

  1. date (point of time)

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

datum n

  1. date; (day, month and year)

Usage notes[edit]

  • The now very uncommon (or obsolete) declension datot-data was used in 1958.

Declension[edit]

Declension of datum 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative datum datumet datum datumen
Genitive datums datumets datums datumens

See also[edit]