datum

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See also: dátum and Datum

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin datum.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈdeɪtʌm/, /ˈdɑːtʌm/

Noun[edit]

datum ‎(plural data or datums)

  1. (plural: data) A measurement of something on a scale understood by both the recorder (a person or device) and the reader (another person or device). The scale is arbitrarily defined, such as from 1 to 10 by ones, 1 to 100 by 0.1, or simply true or false, on or off, yes, no, or maybe, etc.
  2. (plural: data) (philosophy) A fact known from direct observation.
  3. (plural: data) (philosophy) A premise from which conclusions are drawn.
  4. (plural: datums) (cartography, engineering) A fixed reference point.
    • 2007, Roger F Tomlinson, Thinking about GIS: geographic information system planning for managers
      Datums are another important map aspect related to projection. A datum provides a base reference for measuring locations on Earth's surface.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]


Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

datum n

  1. date (point in time)

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

External links[edit]

  • datum in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • datum in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology Scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

datum m ‎(plural datums or data, diminutive datumpje n)

  1. date (point in time)

Usage notes[edit]

Datum is one of the few Dutch words ending on -um that does not have a neutral gender.

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

datum n ‎(plural data, diminutive datumpje n)

  1. datum (piece of information)

Synonyms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Neuter past participle of dare.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

datum n ‎(genitive datī); second declension

  1. gift, present

Inflection[edit]

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative datum data
genitive datī datōrum
dative datō datīs
accusative datum data
ablative datō datīs
vocative datum data

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Verb[edit]

datum

  1. supine of

Participle[edit]

datum

  1. nominative neuter singular of datus
  2. accusative masculine singular of datus
  3. accusative neuter singular of datus
  4. vocative neuter singular of datus

References[edit]

  • DATUM in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • datum in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]
  • datum in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • datum in William Smith., editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin datum.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dǎːtum/
  • Hyphenation: da‧tum

Noun[edit]

dátum m ‎(Cyrillic spelling да́тум)

  1. date (as in day, month, and year)

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • datum” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Slovene[edit]

Slovene Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia sl

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dátum m inan ‎(genitive dátuma, nominative plural dátumi)

  1. date (point of time)

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

datum n

  1. date; (day, month and year)

Declension[edit]

Inflection of datum 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative datum datumet datum datumen
Genitive datums datumets datums datumens

Usage notes[edit]

  • The now very uncommon (or obsolete) declension datot-data was used in 1958.

See also[edit]