nav

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See also: NAV and náv

Translingual[edit]

Symbol[edit]

nav

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Navajo.

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From navigation, abbreviation.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

nav (uncountable)

  1. (transport, military, Internet) Navigation. Often used attributively, as in nav beacon.

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

nav (third-person singular simple present navs, present participle navving, simple past and past participle navved)

  1. (informal) to navigate

Anagrams[edit]

Angloromani[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Romani nav.

Noun[edit]

nav

  1. name
    Synonyms: lab, lav

References[edit]

  • nav”, in Angloromani Dictionary, The Manchester Romani Project, 2004-2006, page 100

Breton[edit]

Breton cardinal numbers
 <  8 9 10  > 
    Cardinal : nav
    Ordinal : navet

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *naw, from Proto-Celtic *nawan, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁néwn̥.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

nav

  1. nine

See also[edit]

  • (cardinal number): Previous: eizh. Next: dek

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse nǫf (nave), from Proto-Germanic *nabō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃nebʰ- (navel).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /nav/, [naw], [nawˀ]

Noun[edit]

nav n (singular definite navet, plural indefinite nav)

  1. nave (a hub of a wheel)

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Latvian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Reduced form of navaid from nevaid (both still attested in Latvian dialects), originally the negative form of vaid (to be located, to be). (G. F. Stenders, in his 1774 grammar, mentions under nevaid the reduced forms neva, nava and even nav' with an apostrophe.) This form replaced an earlier neir, neira (from ir, ira); compare Lithuanian nėrà. Forms of vaid are occasionally attested in folk tales and songs; A. Bīlenšteins once heard its infinitive form vaist. It was probably an old perfect form, from Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (to see, to know) (“to see (around, where one is)” > “to find oneself, to be located, to be”); cf. Lithuanian vaidalas (apparition, ghost).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

nav

  1. (he, she, it) is not; third-person singular present indicative of nebūt
  2. (they) are not; third-person plural present indicative of nebūt
  3. (with the particle lai) let (him, her, it) not be; third-person singular imperative of nebūt
  4. (with the particle lai) let them not be; third-person plural imperative of būt

References[edit]

  1. ^ Karulis, Konstantīns (1992), “nav”, in Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca (in Latvian), Rīga: AVOTS, →ISBN

Lombard[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Akin to Italian nave, from Latin navis.

Noun[edit]

nav f

  1. ship

Northern Kurdish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Iranian *Hnā́ma, from Proto-Indo-Iranian *Hnā́ma, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁nómn̥.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nav m

  1. name

Derived terms[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse nǫf f, from Proto-Germanic *nabō.

Noun[edit]

nav n (definite singular navet, indefinite plural nav, definite plural nava or navene)

  1. a hub (centre of a wheel)

References[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse nǫf f, from Proto-Germanic *nabō.

Noun[edit]

nav n (definite singular navet, indefinite plural nav, definite plural nava)

  1. a hub (centre of a wheel)

References[edit]

Piedmontese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nav f

  1. ship

Romani[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Prakrit 𑀡𑀸𑀫 (ṇāma), from Sanskrit नामन् (nāman).

Noun[edit]

nav m (nominative plural nava)

  1. name

Descendants[edit]

  • Angloromani: nav

References[edit]

  • Yūsuke Sumi (2018), “nav”, in ニューエクスプレス ロマ(ジプシー)語 [New Express Romani (Gypsy)] (in Japanese), Tokyo: Hakusuisha, →ISBN, page 140
  • Milena Hübschmannová (January 2003), “Names of Roma”, in ROMBASE Cultural Database[1] (in English), Prague, archived from the original on 2021-02-17

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin nāvis.

Noun[edit]

nav f (plural navs)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) ship

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish navan, cognate with English nave, both from Proto-Germanic *nabō.

Noun[edit]

nav n

  1. a hub (central part of a wheel)

Declension[edit]

Declension of nav 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative nav navet nav naven
Genitive navs navets navs navens

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Uzbek[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Arabic نَوْع (nawʕ).

Noun[edit]

nav (plural navlar)

  1. sort, kind

Declension[edit]