pagan

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Pagan, págán, and păgân

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Recorded in English since about 1375. Borrowed from Latin pāgānus (rural, rustic), later "civilian". The meaning "not (Judeo-)Christian" arose in Vulgar Latin, probably from the 4th century.[1] It is unclear whether this usage is derived primarily from the "rustic" or from the "civilian" meaning, which in Roman army jargon meant 'clumsy'. As a self-designation of neopagans attested since 1990.

In Old Persian in pre-Zoroastrian Iran, the word "bagh [بغ]" (pl. "baghan") meaning "god", "creator" or "the greater" was used to refer to the gods especially Mithra. The practice of worshipping "baghan" is "baghani" religion [بغانی]. The word has entered Old Slavic Languages ["Бог" in Russian means "god"] and Latin through the practice of Mithraism, a mystery religion worshipping Mithras (Mitra) known as an early rival of Christianity.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: pā'gən, IPA(key): /ˈpeɪɡən/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪɡən

Adjective[edit]

pagan (not comparable)

  1. Relating to, characteristic of religions that differ from main world religions.
    Many converted societies transformed their pagan deities into saints.
  2. (by extension, derogatory) Savage, immoral, uncivilized, wild.

Usage notes[edit]

  • When referring to modern paganism, the term is now often capitalized, like other terms referring to religions.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

  • (religion):

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Noun[edit]

pagan (plural pagans)

  1. A person not adhering to a main world religion; a follower of a pantheistic or nature-worshipping religion.
    This community has a surprising number of pagans.
  2. (by extension, derogatory) An uncivilized or unsocialized person.
  3. (by extension, derogatory) An unruly, badly educated child.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Augustine, Divers. Quaest. 83.

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Verb[edit]

pagan

  1. third-person plural present subjunctive of pagar

Cebuano[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: pa‧gan

Verb[edit]

pagan

  1. to embroil; to draw into a situation; to cause to be involved
  2. to implicate; to connect or involve in an unfavorable or criminal way with something
  3. to fall victim to a friendly fire
  4. (military) to fall victim as collateral damage
  5. to be hit by a stray bullet
  6. to get caught in a crossfire
  7. (games, of marbles) to hit the adjacent marble with the target marble

Quotations[edit]

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:pagan.


Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Latin paganus, through either Old East Slavic поганъ (poganŭ) or directly from Latin, through the German crusaders. Cognate to Finnish pakana.

Noun[edit]

pagan (genitive pagana, partitive paganat)

  1. pagan, heathen
  2. a devil, an evil spirit

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Interjection[edit]

pagan

  1. damn, darn, heck

Galician[edit]

Verb[edit]

pagan

  1. third-person plural present indicative of pagar

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

pagan

  1. Second-person plural (ustedes) present indicative form of pagar.
  2. Third-person plural (ellos, ellas, also used with ustedes?) present indicative form of pagar.

Volapük[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From pag (paganism) +‎ -an.

Noun[edit]

pagan (plural pagans)

  1. (Volapük Nulik) pagan, gentile

Declension[edit]