pagan

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Pagan, págán, and păgân

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Recorded in English since about 1375. From Latin pāgānus (rural, rustic), later "civilian". The meaning "not (Judeo-)Christian" arose in Vulgar Latin, probably from the 4th century.[1] It is unclear whether this usage is derived primarily from the "rustic" or from the "civilian" meaning, which in Roman army jargon meant 'clumsy'. As a self-designation of neopagans attested since 1990.

In Old Persian in pre-Zoroastrian Iran, the word "bagh [بغ]" (pl. "baghan") meaning "god", "creator" or "the greater" was used to refer to the gods especially Mithra. The practice of worshipping "baghan" is "baghani" religion [بغانی]. The word has entered Old Slavic Languages ["Бог" in Russian means "god"] and Latin through the practice of Mithraism, a mystery religion worshipping Mithras (Mitra) known as an early rival of Christianity.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

pagan (not comparable)

  1. Relating to, characteristic of or adhering to non-Abrahamist religions (i.e. not Christianity, Judaism, or Islam), especially earlier polytheism.
    Many converted societies transformed their pagan deities into saints.
  2. (by extension, pejorative) Savage, immoral, uncivilized, wild.

Usage notes[edit]

  • When referring to modern paganism, the term is now often capitalized, like other terms referring to religions.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Noun[edit]

pagan (plural pagans)

  1. A person not adhering to an Abrahamist religion; a follower of a pantheistic or nature-worshipping religion.
    This community has a surprising number of pagans.
  2. (by extension, pejorative) An uncivilized or unsocialized person.
  3. (by extension, pejorative) An unruly, badly educated child.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Augustine, Divers. Quaest. 83.

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Verb[edit]

pagan

  1. third-person plural present subjunctive of pagar

Cebuano[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: pa‧gan

Verb[edit]

pagan

  1. to embroil; to draw into a situation; to cause to be involved
  2. to implicate; to connect or involve in an unfavorable or criminal way with something
  3. to fall victim to a friendly fire
  4. (games, of marbles) to hit the adjacent marble with the target marble

Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Latin paganus, through either Old East Slavic поганъ (poganŭ) or directly from Latin, through the German crusaders. Cognate to Finnish pakana.

Noun[edit]

pagan (genitive pagana, partitive paganat)

  1. pagan, heathen
  2. a devil, an evil spirit

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Interjection[edit]

pagan

  1. damn, darn, heck

Galician[edit]

Verb[edit]

pagan

  1. third-person plural present indicative of pagar

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

pagan

  1. Second-person plural (ustedes) present indicative form of pagar.
  2. Third-person plural (ellos, ellas, also used with ustedes?) present indicative form of pagar.

Volapük[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From pag (paganism) +‎ -an.

Noun[edit]

pagan (plural pagans)

  1. (Volapük Nulik) pagan, gentile

Declension[edit]