lig

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See also: lig. and -lig

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English liggen, from Old English licgan (to lie, be situated, be at rest, remain) and Old Norse liggja (to lie). More at lie.

Verb[edit]

lig (third-person singular simple present ligs, present participle ligging, simple past and past participle ligged)

  1. (intransitive, Britain dialectal) To lie; be in a prostrate or recumbent position.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Edmund Spenser to this entry?)
  2. (transitive, Britain dialectal) To lay.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ləχ/
  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Dutch licht, from Proto-Germanic *linhtaz.

Adjective[edit]

lig (attributive ligte, comparative ligter, superlative ligste)

  1. (of weight) light; not heavy
    Die tas is lig.
    The suitcase is light.
  2. (figuratively) slight; mild
    Daar het 'n ligte wind gewaai.
    A slight wind was blowing.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Dutch lichten, derived from etymology 1.

Verb[edit]

lig (present lig, present participle ligtende, past participle gelig)

  1. (transitive) to lift, to raise
  2. (transitive) to weigh (the anchor)

Etymology 3[edit]

From Dutch licht, from Proto-Germanic *leuhtą (noun) and *leuhtaz (adjective).

Noun[edit]

lig (plural ligte)

  1. light
    Blou lig het die kortste golflengte van die primêre kleure.
    Blue light has the shortest wavelength among primary colours.

Adjective[edit]

lig (attributive ligte, comparative ligter, superlative ligste)

  1. (of color or complexion) light; pale; not dark
    Hy dra 'n ligblou hemp.
    He wears a light blue shirt.

Etymology 4[edit]

From Dutch lichten, from Proto-Germanic *liuhtijaną, derived from etymology 3.

Verb[edit]

lig (present lig, present participle ligtende, past participle gelig)

  1. to shine; to be or become light
    Supernova's is geweldig ligtende uitbarstings van massiewe sterre.
    Supernovas are immensely shining explosions of massive stars.

See also[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *liga, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃ligos (indigent, needy, ill). Cognate to Ancient Greek ὀλίγος (olígos, small, little), Lithuanian ligà (illness), Old Irish líach (wretched).

Adjective[edit]

i lig m (feminine e ligë, masculine plural lig, feminine plural liga)

  1. evil, wicked
  2. bad, nasty
  3. ill, sick
  4. weak, cowardly
  5. (dialectal) pregnant, with child

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lig f

  1. genitive plural of liga

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse líkr, from Proto-Germanic *galīkaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lig (neuter ligt or lig, plural and definite singular attributive lig)

  1. equal to
  2. like, similar to

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse lík (body), from Proto-Germanic *līką, from Proto-Indo-European *līg-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lig n (singular definite liget, plural indefinite lig)

  1. body, corpse
  2. crock (an old or broken-down vehicle)
Inflection[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse lík (leech), borrowed from Middle Low German līk, from Proto-Germanic *līką (bolt-rope), cf. also Dutch lijk and English leech. The noun belongs to the Proto-Indo-European root *leyǵ- (to bind).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lig n (singular definite liget, plural indefinite lig)

  1. (nautical) leech

References[edit]

Inflection[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

See ligge (to lie).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

lig

  1. imperative of ligge



Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

lig

  1. first-person singular present indicative of liggen
  2. imperative of liggen

Anagrams[edit]


Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From earlier léig, from Old Irish léicid, from Proto-Celtic *linkʷīti, from Proto-Indo-European *linékʷti, nasal-infix present of *leykʷ- (to leave). Cognate with Sanskrit रिणक्ति (riṇákti), Latin linquō, Ancient Greek λείπω (leípō), Gothic 𐌻𐌴𐌹𐍈𐌰𐌽 (leiƕan), Lithuanian lìkti.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

lig (present analytic ligeann, future analytic ligfidh, verbal noun ligean, past participle ligthe)

  1. to let, allow

Conjugation[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Maguindanao[edit]

Noun[edit]

lig

  1. (anatomy) neck

Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *laugi, from Proto-Germanic *laugiz (fire, flame, lightning), from Proto-Indo-European *leuk- (light; white; to shine). Cognate with Old High German loug, Old Norse lǫygr, log, loga (flame, low). More at low.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

līġ m (nominative plural līgas)

  1. fire; flame
    līġbǣreflaming
    līġcwalufiery torment
    līġdracafiery dragon
    līġræscetunglightning
    līġȳþwave of fire

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle English: lye, lei, lyȝ

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lig f

  1. genitive plural of liga

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French ligue.

Noun[edit]

lig (definite accusative ligi, plural ligler)

  1. league (organization of sports teams)

Declension[edit]

Inflection
Nominative lig
Definite accusative ligi
Singular Plural
Nominative lig ligler
Definite accusative ligi ligleri
Dative lige liglere
Locative ligde liglerde
Ablative ligden liglerden
Genitive ligin liglerin

Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

lig

  1. liquor