tape

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: tapé, tapè, and tápe

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English tape, tappe, from Old English tæppa, tæppe (ribbon, tape). Probably akin to Old Frisian tapia (to pull, rip, tear), Middle Low German tappen, tāpen (to grab, pull, rip, tear, snatch), Middle High German zāfen, zāven (to pull, tear).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /teɪ̯p/, [tʰeɪ̯p]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪp

Noun[edit]

tape (countable and uncountable, plural tapes)

  1. Flexible material in a roll with a sticky surface on one or both sides; adhesive tape.
    Hand me some tape. I need to fix a tear in this paper.
  2. Thin and flat paper, plastic or similar flexible material, usually produced in the form of a roll.
    We made some decorative flowers out of the tape we bought.
  3. Finishing tape, stretched across a track to mark the end of a race.
    Jones broke the tape in 47.77 seconds, a new world record.
  4. Magnetic or optical recording media in a roll; videotape or audio tape.
    Did you get that on tape?
  5. (informal, by extension) Any video or audio recording, regardless of the method used to produce it.
    • 2018 August 18, Susan Edelman, New York Post:
      “It was one of the most severe beatings they’ve seen on tape,” an FDNY insider said, recalling the reaction by brass who viewed video of the bloody fisticuffs.
  6. (informal) An unthinking, patterned response triggered by a particular stimulus.
    Old couples will sometimes play tapes at each other during a fight.
  7. (trading, from ticker tape) The series of prices at which a financial instrument trades.
    Don’t fight the tape.
  8. (ice hockey) The wrapping of the primary puck-handling surface of a hockey stick
    His pass was right on the tape.
  9. (printing, historical) A strong flexible band rotating on pulleys for directing the sheets in a printing machine.
  10. (possible, obsolete, UK, slang) Liquor, alcoholic drink, especially gin or brandy. (Especially in prison slang or among domestic servants and women.)
    white tape, Holland tape, blue tape (gin); red tape (brandy or wine)
    • 1827 (originally 1755?), Connoisseur, page=223:
      Madam Gin has been christened by as many names as a German princess : every petty chandler's shop will sell you Sky-blue, and every night-cellar furnish you with Holland tape, three yards a penny. Nor can I see the difference []}}
    • 1817, The White Dwarf: A London Weekly Publication, page 222:
      [] who is now puffing his pipe and sipping his grog, as unconcerned as a Dutch fiddler at a merry-making, has no business here selling his cheese and candles in the day-time, and his yards of tape in the evening: [] and now then for the tape-shop. []
    • 1830 (1854), Edward Bulwer Lytton, Paul Clifford:
      A tumbler of blue ruin fill, fill for me! / Red tape those as likes it may drain, / But whatever the lush, it a bumper must be.
      []
      Oh! those jovial days are ne'er forgot! But the tape' lags—When I be's dead, you'll drink one put To poor old Bags!
  11. Clipping of red tape (time-consuming bureaucratic procedures).
    • 1923, Henry C. Clark, Departmental Practice, Admission of Attorneys, Etc, page 7:
      [When dealing with the] Federal Government, "red tape" is unavoidable. Perseverance, good humor and thoroughness will almost invariably cut through the "tape” or lead to the proper official where courteous and attentive treatment will be received.
    • 1953, United States. Congress. House. Committee on the Judiciary, Hearings, page 53:
      He was going to cut through the tape and ship this Army stuff straight to France.
    • 1988, United States Senate Select Committee on Secret Military Assistance to Iran and the Nicaraguan Opposition, Iran-Contra Investigation: [...] One Hundredth Congress, First Session, page 26:
      Mr. Cheney: [] to move in the direction of deciding that the only way to get anything done, to cut through the red tape, to be able to move aggressively, is to have it done, in effect, inside the boundary of the White House. [] Mr. North: [] there are certainly times when one has to cut through the tape.
    • 2011 March 1, Simon Maier; Jeremy Kourdi, The 100: Insights and lessons from 100 of the greatest speakers and speeches ever delivered, Marshall Cavendish International Asia Pte Ltd, →ISBN, page 295:
      As Treasurer and Governor of Texas, she had an ability to cut through the tape and conventions to get stuff done and make things better. She modernized systems, made government more transparent and accountable and []

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

tape (third-person singular simple present tapes, present participle taping, simple past and past participle taped)

  1. To bind with adhesive tape.
    Be sure to tape your parcel securely before posting it.
  2. To record, originally onto magnetic tape.
    You shouldn’t have said that. The microphone was on and we were taping.
  3. (informal, passive) To understand, figure out.
    I've finally got this thing taped.

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From English tape (adhesive tape).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /tɛjp/, [tˢɛjb̥]

Noun[edit]

tape c (singular definite tapen, not used in plural form)

  1. Scotch tape, adhesive tape
Usage notes[edit]

Rarely used in the sense video or audiocassette tape as a synonym to bånd. In this case it is neuter gender, singular definite tapet, plural indefinite tapes or tape, plural definite tapene.

Synonyms[edit]
Further reading[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From English tape (to bind with adhesive tape).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • infinitive IPA(key): /tɛjpə/, [ˈtˢɛjb̥ə]
  • imperative IPA(key): /tɛjp/, [tˢɛjb̥ˀ]

Verb[edit]

tape (imperative tape, infinitive at tape, present tense taper, past tense tapede, perfect tense er/har tapet)

  1. tape (to bind with adhesive tape) [from 1965]

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English tape.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tape m (plural tapes, diminutive tapeje n)

  1. tape

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From taper.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tape f (plural tapes)

  1. a gentle touch
  2. a pat
    Recevoir une tape sur la joue, la main, les fesses.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)

Verb[edit]

tape

  1. inflection of taper:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Guaraní[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tape (dependent form rape, third-person possessed form hape)

  1. path
  2. way
  3. street

Indonesian[edit]

Noun[edit]

tape (first-person possessive tapeku, second-person possessive tapemu, third-person possessive tapenya)

  1. Informal form of tapai.

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English tæppa, tæppe (ribbon, tape); forms with a long vowel are difficult to explain.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈtap(ə)/, /ˈtaːp(ə)/

Noun[edit]

tape (plural tapes)

  1. (rare) band, ribbon, tape
Descendants[edit]
  • English: tape (see there for further descendants)
  • Scots: tape
  • Yola: taape
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

tape

  1. Alternative form of tappe (plug)

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

tape

  1. Alternative form of tappe (gentle touch)

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English tape.

Noun[edit]

tape m (definite singular tapen, indefinite plural taper, definite plural tapene)

  1. alternative form of teip

Verb[edit]

tape (present tense taper, past tense tapa or tapet, past participle tapa or tapet)

  1. alternative form of teipe

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse tapa. Cognate with Danish tabe, Swedish tappa and Faroese tapa.

Verb[edit]

tape (present tense taper, past tense tapte, past participle tapt)

  1. to lose (opposite of win)
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse tapa. Cognate with Danish tabe, Swedish tappa, and Faroese tapa.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

tape (present tense tapar or taper, past tense tapa or tapte, supine and past participle tapa or tapt, present participle tapande, imperative tap)

  1. to lose (to come last, lose a match, lose money)

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English tape.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (noun): IPA(key): /tæɪ̯p/
  • (verb): IPA(key): /²tæɪ̯.pə/

Noun[edit]

tape m (definite singular tapen, indefinite plural tapar, definite plural tapane)

  1. alternative spelling of teip

Verb[edit]

tape (present tense tapar, past tense tapa, past participle tapa, passive infinitive tapast, present participle tapande, imperative tape/tap)

  1. alternative spelling of teipa

References[edit]

  • “tape” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.
  • “tapa”, in Norsk Ordbok: ordbok over det norske folkemålet og det nynorske skriftmålet, Oslo: Samlaget, 1950-2016

Anagrams[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

 

Verb[edit]

tape

  1. inflection of tapar:
    1. first-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular present subjunctive
    3. third-person singular imperative

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

tape m (plural tapes)

  1. (Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Panama, Puerto Rico) Scotch tape, tape

Verb[edit]

tape

  1. inflection of tapar:
    1. first-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular present subjunctive
    3. third-person singular imperative

Further reading[edit]


Yola[edit]

Verb[edit]

tape

  1. Alternative form of teap
    • 1927, THE ANCIENT DIALECT OF THE BARONIES OF FORTH AND BARGY, COUNTY WEXFORD:
      "Tape"——to turn a car over turning a corner.
      ——————————————————

References[edit]

  • Kathleen A. Browne (1927) The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland Sixth Series, Vol.17 No.2, Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, page 128