Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse .

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

  1. (transitive, with dative) to reach (a place)
  2. (transitive, with dative) to get, catch, apprehend (a physical object)
  3. (transitive, with dative) to reach, attain (a goal)
    Ég mun heimsyfirráðum!
    I will attain world domination!

Conjugation[edit]

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish .

Particle[edit]

  1. don’t (particle used to introduce a negative imperative; triggers h-prothesis of a following vowel)
    déan sin.
    Don’t do that.
    habair é.
    Don’t mention it.
  2. may...not (particle used with raibh, the present subjunctive of , to introduce a negative wish)
    Dealbh raibh tú.
    May you never be destitute.
  3. (Munster) Alternative form of nach (not) (in questions; triggers h-prothesis; used with the dependent form of an irregular verb if there is one)
    fuil ocras ort?
    Are you not hungry?
    Chonac í, facas?
    I saw her, didn’t I?

Conjunction[edit]

(triggers h-prothesis; used with the dependent form of an irregular verb if there is one)

  1. (Munster) Alternative form of nach (that...not)
    Dúirt sé raibh carr aige.
    He said that he didn’t have a car.

Etymology 2[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

  1. nor
    Níl deartháir deirfiúr agam.
    I have neither brother nor sister.
  2. used between two identical or similar words to intensify a negative
    Ní fhaca sí solas solas.
    She saw no light whatsoever (lit. She didn’t see light or light).

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Irish indás (than (it) is).

Alternative forms[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

(triggers h-prothesis)

  1. than
    Is airde Máire Peadar.
    Mary is taller than Peter.
  2. but (used rhetorically in direct and indirect questions)
    Cé a bhí ina shuí ann m’athair féin?
    Who was sitting there but my own father?
  3. used to connect a predicate noun to its subject in a cleft sentence introduced by a copular form
    Is é a dúirt sé gur dhíol sé a ríomhaire lena chara.
    What he said was that he sold his computer to his friend.
    • 1907, Peadar Ua Laoghaire, Séadna, p. 6:
      Bhí fear ann fad ó agus isé ainim a bhí air ’ná Séadna.
      Once upon a time there was a man and the name that he had was Séadna.
Derived terms[edit]

Mandarin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Romanization[edit]

(Zhuyin ㄋㄚˊ)

  1. Pinyin transcription of
  2. Pinyin transcription of
  3. Pinyin transcription of
  4. Pinyin transcription of
  5. Pinyin transcription of
  6. Pinyin transcription of
  7. Pinyin transcription of
  8. Pinyin transcription of

Navajo[edit]

Postposition[edit]

  1. for you, for your sake
  2. in your favor
    yáʼátʼééhit is good for you
    áshłééhI’m making it for you

Inflection[edit]


Northern Sami[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈnaː/

Adverb[edit]

  1. so, thus, in this way

Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *nēhwijaną.

Verb[edit]

  1. to near, to reach

Portuguese[edit]

Interjection[edit]

  1. Eye dialect spelling of não.

Spanish[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

  1. Eye dialect spelling of nada.

Vietnamese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Vietic *s-naːʔ, from Proto-Mon-Khmer *snaʔ; cognates include Khmer ស្នា (sna) and Bahnar hră.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

(classifier cái)

  1. crossbow

Related terms[edit]