prendre

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See also: prendré

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan prendre, from Latin prendere, alternative form of prehendere, present active infinitive of prehendō, from prae- (before) + *hendō (I take, seize) (not attested without prefix), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰed-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

prendre (first-person singular present prenc, past participle pres)

  1. to take

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Franco-Provençal[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin prendere, variant of prehendere (to seize), present active infinitive of prehendō.

Verb[edit]

prendre

  1. to take

Conjugation[edit]

  • Literary imperfect: prenim, preniés, preniet, preniams, preniaz, preníant

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French prendre, from Old French prendre, prandre, from Latin prendere, alternative form of prehendere (to seize), present active infinitive of prehendō, from prae- (before) + *hendō (I take, seize) (not attested without prefix), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰed-.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /pʁɑ̃dʁ/
  • (file)

Verb[edit]

prendre

  1. (transitive) to take
    prends ma main.take my hand
  2. (transitive) to eat; to drink
    elle prend un caféshe is drinking a coffee
  3. (transitive) to get; to buy
    Je vais prendre le plat du jour.(please add an English translation of this usage example)
  4. (transitive) to rob; to deprive
    prendre quelque chose à quelqu'un(please add an English translation of this usage example)
  5. (transitive) to make
    prendre une décisionto make a decision
    prendre des mesures draconiennesto take draconian measures
  6. (intransitive) to catch, to work, to start
    le feu ne prend pasthe fire won't start
    la sauce ne prend pasthe sauce isn't thickening
    ma mayonnaise ne prend pasmy mayonnaise isn't setting
    ça ne prend pas avec moithat won't wash with me
  7. (reflexive) to get (something) caught (in), to jam
    je me suis pris la main dans la porteI caught my hand in the door
  8. (transitive, in various idiomatic expressions)
    prendre en aversion(please add an English translation of this usage example)
    prendre en grippe(please add an English translation of this usage example)
    prendre en dégoût(please add an English translation of this usage example)
  9. (in various idiomatic expressions, followed by a partitive) to gain
    prendre de la vitesseto gain speed
    prendre du galonto gain a promotion
    prendre de l'avanceto gain ground
    prendre du retardto fall behind schedule, to run late, to drop behind
    prendre de la hauteurto gain some perspective
    prendre du reculto take a step back
    prendre de la bouteilleto gain experience
    en prendre de la graineto take away a lesson
    prendre du poidsto gain weight
    prendre de la masseto build muscle
    prendre du bouchon(please add an English translation of this usage example)
    prendre de l'élan(please add an English translation of this usage example)
    prendre de l'âge(please add an English translation of this usage example)
    prendre de la valeur(please add an English translation of this usage example)
    prendre de l'importance(please add an English translation of this usage example)

Conjugation[edit]

This verb is quite irregular, with the following patterns:

  • In the infinitive, in the singular forms of the present indicative, and in the future and the conditional, it is conjugated like rendre, perdre, etc. (sometimes called the regular -re verbs).
  • In the plural forms of the present indicative and imperative, in the imperfect indicative, in the present subjunctive, and in the present participle, it is conjugated like appeler or jeter, using the stem prenn- before mute ‘e’ and the stem pren- elsewhere.
  • In the past participle, and in the past historic and the imperfect subjunctive, its conjugation resembles that of mettre.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French prendre, prandre, from Latin prendō, prendere, from prehendō.

Verb[edit]

prendre

  1. to take

Descendants[edit]

  • French: prendre

Norman[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French prendre, prandre, from Latin prendō, prendere, an alternative form of prehendō, prehendere (lay hold of, seize, grasp, grab, snatch, take, catch).

Verb[edit]

prendre

  1. (Jersey) to take

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan prendre.

Verb[edit]

prendre (Provençal)

  1. (transitive) to take

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin prendere, present active infinitive of prendō, alternative form of prehendō.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈpren.drə/, (later) /ˈpran.drə/

Verb[edit]

prendre

  1. to take

Conjugation[edit]

This verb conjugates as a third-group verb. This verb has irregularities in its conjugation. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old Occitan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin prendere, variant of prehendere, present active infinitive of prehendō. Gallo-Romance cognate with Old French prendre.

Verb[edit]

prendre

  1. to take

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]