rider

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See also: Rider

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English ryder, ridere, from Late Old English rīdere (rider, knight); equivalent to ride +‎ -er. Compare Dutch rijder, German Reiter, Swedish ryttare.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rider (plural riders)

  1. A mounted person.
    1. (now archaic or historical) A knight, or other mounted warrior. [from 11th c.]
    2. An old Dutch gold coin with the figure of a man on horseback stamped upon it. [from 14th c.]
    3. (generally) Someone who rides a horse or (later) a bicycle, motorcycle etc. [from 14th c.]
    4. (now historical or archaic) A mounted robber; a bandit, especially in the Scottish borders. [from 16th c.]
      • '1655, William Drummond of Hawthornden, History of Scotland []
        In Evosdale eight and fourty notorious Riders are hung on growing Trees, the most famous of which was John Arm-Strong
    5. (obsolete) Someone who breaks in or manages a horse; a riding master. [16th–17th c.]
      • c. 1599, William Shakespeare, As You Like It, I.1:
        They are taught their mannage, and to that end Riders deerely hir'd.
    6. (now rare, historical) An agent who goes out with samples of goods to obtain orders; a commercial traveller or travelling salesman. [from 18th c.]
      • 1790, James Boswell, in Danziger & Brady (eds.), Boswell: The Great Biographer (Journal 1789–1795), Yale 1989, p. 70:
        I set out with a Paisley manufacturer and a London rider, the latter of whom I envied for his smartness and self-complacency.
    7. (now chiefly US) Someone riding in a vehicle; a passenger on public transport. [from 19th c.]
      • 2021 March 25, Somini Sengupta; Geneva Abdul; Manuela Andreoni; Veronica Penney, “Riders Are Abandoning Buses and Trains. That’s a Problem for Climate Change.”, in The New York Times[1], ISSN 0362-4331:
        On the London Underground, Piccadilly Circus station is nearly vacant on a weekday morning, while the Delhi Metro is ferrying fewer than half of the riders it used to.
  2. An addition, supplement.
    1. (politics) A supplementary clause added to a document after drafting, especially to a bill under the consideration of a legislature. [from 17th c.]
    2. An amendment or addition to an entertainer's performance contract, often covering a performer's equipment or food, drinks, and general comfort requirements. [from 20th c.]
    3. An additional matter or question arising in corollary; a qualification. [from 19th c.]
    4. A supplementary question, now especially in mathematics. [from 19th c.]
      • 1886, Arthur Sherburne Hardy, The Wind of Destiny
        This [question] was a rider which Mab found difficult to answer.
  3. Technical senses.
    1. (shipbuilding) An interior rib occasionally fixed in a ship's hold, reaching from the keelson to the beams of the lower deck, to strengthen the frame. [from 17th c.]
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Totten to this entry?)
    2. (mining, now rare) Rock material in a vein of ore, dividing it. [from 17th c.]
    3. (nautical, in the plural) The second tier of casks in a vessel's hold. [from 19th c.]
    4. A small, sliding piece of thin metal on a balance, used to determine small weights. [from 19th c.]
    5. (cartomancy) The first Lenormand card, also known as either the horseman or the cavalier.
    6. (chess) A piece, such as the rook or bishop, which moves any distance in one direction, as long as no other piece is in the way.


Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

rider c

  1. indefinite plural of ride

Verb[edit]

rider

  1. present of ride

French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle French rider, from Old French rider (to wrinkle), from Old High German rīdan, wrīdan (to turn; twist; wind; wring; wind up; wrench). Cognate with German reiden (to turn; tie up; lace). More at writhe.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

rider

  1. (transitive, intransitive) to wrinkle
Conjugation[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English ride.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

rider

  1. (Louisiana, Cajun French) to ride
Conjugation[edit]

Interlingua[edit]

Verb[edit]

rider

  1. to laugh

Related terms[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

rider

  1. Alternative form of ryder

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French rider (to wrinkle), from Old High German rīdan (to turn; twist).

Verb[edit]

rider

  1. to wrinkle

Conjugation[edit]

  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Descendants[edit]

  • French: rider

Middle Low German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the verb rîden (ride). Cognate with English rider and German Reiter (rider).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rîder

  1. a rider

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

rider

  1. present of ride

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

rider m (plural rideres)

  1. rider, biker (motorcyclist)

Swedish[edit]

Verb[edit]

rider

  1. present tense of rida.

Anagrams[edit]