volt

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See also: Volt

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Homophone: vault

Etymology 1[edit]

Named after Italian physicist Alessandro Volta. For the surname, see Italian Volta.

Noun[edit]

volt (plural volts)

  1. In the International System of Units, the derived unit of electrical potential and electromotive force (voltage); the potential difference across a conductor when a current of one ampere uses one watt of power. Symbol: V
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

French volte

Noun[edit]

volt (plural volts)

  1. A circular tread; a gait by which a horse going sideways round a centre makes two concentric tracks.
  2. (fencing) A sudden movement to avoid a thrust.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for volt in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From the past participle of Old Catalan voldre, from Latin volvere. Corresponds to Vulgar Latin *voltus, from *volŭtus, from Latin volūtus.

Noun[edit]

volt m (plural volts)

  1. turn, round

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Named for Alessandro Volta.

Noun[edit]

volt m (plural volts)

  1. volt

Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English volt

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

volt m

  1. volt

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English volt

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

volt m (plural volts, diminutive voltje n)

  1. volt (unit)

Derived terms[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Named after the Italian physicist Alessandro Volta. For the surname, see Volta.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

volt n (genitive singular volts, plural volt)

  1. volt, the SI unit of electric potential.

Declension[edit]

Declension of volt
n3 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative volt voltið volt voltini
accusative volt voltið volt voltini
dative volti voltinum voltum voltunum
genitive volts voltsins volta voltanna

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English volt

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

volt m (plural volts)

  1. volt

Further reading[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English volt

Noun[edit]

volt m (plural [please provide])

  1. volt

Synonyms[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From the same Proto-Finno-Ugric *wole- or *woli- as Finnish and Estonian olla. Compare similarities with Old Hungarian vola, later vala (same meaning).

Verb[edit]

volt

  1. third-person singular indicative past indefinite of van
    Milyen volt az előadás?How was the show?

Participle[edit]

volt

  1. past participle of van

Adjective[edit]

volt (not comparable)

  1. ex-, former, late, past, sometime
    az egyetem volt tanárathe former professor of the university

Particle[edit]

volt

  1. (archaic) Used after a past-tense verb form to express past perfect.
    • 1880 (translation), 411 BC (original), János Arany (translator), Aristophanes (original), A nők ünnepe (Thesmophoriazusae).[1] English translation: 2007, George Theodoridis.[2]
      A vén gaz asszony meg, ki hozta volt, ¶ Fut vigyorogva a férjhez s kiáltja:
      Then the old woman picks it up [literally, “who had brought it”] and rushes out to the husband! She puts on a big grin on her face and tells him straight out,

Etymology 2[edit]

Named after the Italian physicist Alessandro Volta.[1]

Noun[edit]

volt (plural voltok)

  1. volt (unit of measure, symbol: V)
Declension[edit]
Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative volt voltok
accusative voltot voltokat
dative voltnak voltoknak
instrumental volttal voltokkal
causal-final voltért voltokért
translative volttá voltokká
terminative voltig voltokig
essive-formal voltként voltokként
essive-modal
inessive voltban voltokban
superessive volton voltokon
adessive voltnál voltoknál
illative voltba voltokba
sublative voltra voltokra
allative volthoz voltokhoz
elative voltból voltokból
delative voltról voltokról
ablative volttól voltoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
volté voltoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
voltéi voltokéi
Possessive forms of volt
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. voltom voltjaim
2nd person sing. voltod voltjaid
3rd person sing. voltja voltjai
1st person plural voltunk voltjaink
2nd person plural voltotok voltjaitok
3rd person plural voltjuk voltjaik

Derived terms[edit]

Compound words

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tótfalusi, István. Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára (’A Storehouse of Foreign Words: an explanatory and etymological dictionary of foreign words’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2005. →ISBN

Further reading[edit]

  • (the past form of van or an auxiliary particle expressing past perfect): volt in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.
  • (former, previous, bygone): volt in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.
  • (unit): volt in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Named after Italian physicist Alessandro Volta.

Noun[edit]

volt n (genitive singular volts, nominative plural volt)

  1. volt

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • volt in Icelandic dictionaries at islex.is

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English volt, itself named after Italian physicist Alessandro Volta, from Volta.

Noun[edit]

volt m (invariable)

  1. volt

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

volt

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of volō

References[edit]

  • volt in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • volt in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vultus.

Noun[edit]

volt m (oblique plural volz or voltz, nominative singular volz or voltz, nominative plural volt)

  1. face

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (volt)

Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English volt

Noun[edit]

volt m (plural volts)

  1. volt (unit of measure)

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English volt

Noun[edit]

volt m (Cyrillic spelling волт)

  1. volt

Declension[edit]


Slovak[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Named after the Italian physicist Alessandro Volta. For the surname, see Volta.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

volt m (genitive singular voltu, nominative plural volty, genitive plural voltov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. volt, the SI unit of electric potential.

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • volt in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French volte, from Italian volta (a turn, rotation).

Noun[edit]

volt c

  1. a somersault; a jump where one turns one or more times forwards (or backwards)
  2. (by extension) The action where something of large size turns over. See slå en volt.
    Bilen körde av vägen och slog en volt.
    The car went off the road and turned over a whole turn.

Declension[edit]

Declension of volt 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative volt volten volter volterna
Genitive volts voltens volters volternas

Anagrams[edit]


Tatar[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English volt

Noun[edit]

volt

  1. volt, the SI unit of electric potential.
80 meñ volt80 thousand volts
[3]

Declension[edit]