grunt

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See also: Grunt and grünt

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English grunten, from Old English grunnettan (to grunt), from Proto-Germanic *grunnatjaną (to grunt), frequentative of Proto-Germanic *grunnōną (to grunt), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrun- (to shout).

Cognate with German grunzen (to grunt), Danish grynte (to grunt). The noun senses are all instances of zero derivation from the verb.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹʌnt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌnt

Noun[edit]

grunt (plural grunts)

  1. A short snorting sound, often to show disapproval, or used as a reply when one is reluctant to speak.
  2. The snorting cry of a pig.
  3. Any fish of the perciform family Haemulidae.
  4. A person who does ordinary and boring work.
    Synonyms: gofer, lackey, peon
  5. (US, military slang) An infantry soldier.
    Coordinate term: pogue
    • 1979, Gustav Hasford, The Short-Timers, New York: Bantam Books, published 1980, →ISBN, page 39:
      The poges stare at the grunts as though the grunts were Hell's Angels at the ballet.
    • 1986, James Cameron, Aliens, spoken by Burke (Paul Reiser):
      He can't make that kind of decision. He's just a grunt!
  6. (slang) The amount of power of which a vehicle is capable.
    • 1992, Autocar & Motor (volume 192, page 61)
      The engine might not possess quite as much grunt as the later 24v six, but it delivers invigorating performance []
    • 2006, Torque (February 2006, page 56)
      With this much grunt, it is surprising that the engine is relatively quiet.
    • 2021 February 1, The Road Ahead, page 55, column 2:
      The lack of bottom-end grunt presents as a particular problem in hilly terrain where the five-speed manual gearbox really earns its keep.
  7. (Canada, US) A dessert of steamed berries and dough, usually blueberries; blueberry grunt.
    Synonyms: fungy, fungee

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

grunt (third-person singular simple present grunts, present participle grunting, simple past and past participle grunted)

  1. (intransitive, of a person) To make a grunt or grunts.
  2. (intransitive, of a pig) To make a grunt or grunts.
  3. (intransitive, Britain, slang) To break wind; to fart.
    Who just grunted?

See also[edit]

The frequentative form gruntle.

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “grunt”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Middle English[edit]

Verb[edit]

grunt

  1. Alternative form of grunten

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Adjective[edit]

grunt

  1. neuter singular of grunn

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Adjective[edit]

grunt

  1. neuter singular of grunn

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *grunduz.

Noun[edit]

grunt m

  1. ground

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Dutch: gront

Further reading[edit]

  • grunt”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *grunduz.

Noun[edit]

grunt m

  1. ground
  2. root
  3. hollow

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Köbler, Gerhard, Althochdeutsches Wörterbuch, (6. Auflage) 2014

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Grund.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grunt m inan

  1. (construction, geology) soil
  2. ground (the bottom of a body of water)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • grunt in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • grunt in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Grund.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grȕnt m (Cyrillic spelling гру̏нт)

  1. (regional) plot of land, lot

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

grunt

  1. absolute indefinite neuter singular of grund.

Adverb[edit]

grunt

  1. shallowly
    gentemot såväl grundt rationalistiska som känslosamt svärmiska religiösa riktningar.
    towards both shallowly rationalistic and emotionally fanatical religious tendencies.