ny

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English[edit]

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Wikipedia

Verb[edit]

ny

  1. obsolete spelling of nigh

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse nýr, from Proto-Germanic *niwjaz, from Proto-Indo-European *néwos (new).

Adjective[edit]

ny (neuter nyt, definite and plural ny or nye, comparative nyere, superlative nyest)

  1. new
  2. fresh
  3. recent
  4. novel
  5. other
  6. different
  7. definite and plural of ny

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse .

Noun[edit]

ny n (singular definite nyet, not used in plural form)

  1. new moon, waxing moon
Antonyms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Ancient Greek Ν (N), ν (n).

Noun[edit]

ny n (singular definite nyet, plural indefinite nyer)

  1. nu; the Greek letter Ν, ν
Inflection[edit]

External links[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ny

  1. neither; nor

Usage notes[edit]

  • Chiefly used at least twice in the same sentence, such as ny riche, ny pouvre (neither rich nor poor)

Descendants[edit]

  • French: ni

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse nýr, from Proto-Germanic *niwjaz, from Proto-Indo-European *néwos (new).

Adjective[edit]

ny (neuter singular nytt, definite singular and plural nye, comparative nyere, superlative nyest or nyeste)

  1. new (recently made or created)

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse nýr, from Proto-Germanic *niwjaz, from Proto-Indo-European *néwos (new).

Adjective[edit]

ny (neuter singular nytt, definite singular and plural nye, comparative nyare, superlative nyast or nyaste)

  1. new (as above)

Derived terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

ny f (plural nys)

  1. nu; the Greek letter Ν, ν

Synonyms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse nýr, from Proto-Germanic *niwjaz, from Proto-Indo-European *néwos (new).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ny

  1. new

Declension[edit]


Vilamovian[edit]

Interjection[edit]

ny

  1. no