ny

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English[edit]

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Wikipedia

Verb[edit]

ny

  1. Obsolete spelling of nigh.

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse nýr, from Proto-Germanic *niwjaz, from Proto-Indo-European *néwos (new).

Adjective[edit]

ny (neuter nyt, definite and plural ny or nye, comparative nyere, superlative nyest)

  1. new
  2. fresh
  3. recent
  4. novel
  5. other
  6. different

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse .

Noun[edit]

ny n (singular definite nyet, not used in plural form)

  1. new moon, waxing moon
Antonyms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Ancient Greek Ν (N), ν (ny).

Noun[edit]

ny n (singular definite nyet, plural indefinite nyer)

  1. nu; the Greek letter Ν, ν
Inflection[edit]

External links[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ny

  1. neither; nor

Usage notes[edit]

  • Chiefly used at least twice in the same sentence, such as ny riche, ny pouvre (neither rich nor poor)

Descendants[edit]

  • French: ni

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse nýr, from Proto-Germanic *niwjaz, from Proto-Indo-European *néwos (new).

Adjective[edit]

ny (neuter singular nytt, definite singular and plural nye, comparative nyere, superlative nyest or nyeste)

  1. new (recently made or created)

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse nýr, from Proto-Germanic *niwjaz, from Proto-Indo-European *néwos (new).

Adjective[edit]

ny (neuter singular nytt, definite singular and plural nye, comparative nyare, superlative nyast or nyaste)

  1. new (as above)

Derived terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

ny f (plural nys)

  1. nu; the Greek letter Ν, ν

Synonyms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse nýr, from Proto-Germanic *niwjaz, from Proto-Indo-European *néwos (new).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ny

  1. new

Declension[edit]


Vilamovian[edit]

Interjection[edit]

ny

  1. no