agro

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See also: agro-

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From aggro, by shortening

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

agro (comparative more agro, superlative most agro)

  1. (Australia, New Zealand, Britain, slang) angry

Anagrams[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Noun[edit]

agro (accusative singular agron, plural agroj, accusative plural agrojn)

  1. field, piece of arable land

Derived terms[edit]

  • agrara (agrarian)
  • agraro (agricultural land (of a region))

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

13th century. From Latin ager, agrum, from Proto-Italic *agros, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éǵros.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

agro m (plural agros)

  1. enclosed farmland usually comprising a single property
    • 1259, Andrés Martínez Salazar (ed.), Documentos gallegos de los siglos XIII al XVI. A Coruña: Casa de la Misericordia, page 44:
      nos damos a isse Pedro Pedrez un agro que jaz sobrela egreia de Uillanoua en Seloure a chantar de pereyros et de mazeyras
      we give this Pedro Pérez a field that is over the church of Vilanova in Sillobre, for planting there pear and apple trees
  2. countryside
  3. primary sector

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • agro” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • agro” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • agro” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • agro” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • agro” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French ager, Italian agro and Spanish agro. In length from English agriculture and Russian агрикульту́ра (agrikulʹtúra).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈaɡro/
  • Hyphenation: ag‧ro

Noun[edit]

agro (plural agri)

  1. field: piece of ground

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *acrus, *acrum, from Latin acer, acrem, from Proto-Italic *akris, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ḱrós (sharp). See also the doublet acre.

Adjective[edit]

agro (feminine singular agra, masculine plural agri, feminine plural agre)

  1. sour, vinegary
Derived terms[edit]
Further reading[edit]
  • agro1 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin ager, agrum, from Proto-Italic *agros, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éǵros.

Noun[edit]

agro m (plural agri)

  1. countryside around a town
Further reading[edit]
  • agro2 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Anagrams[edit]


Ladino[edit]

Adjective[edit]

agro (Latin spelling, feminine agra, masculine plural agros, feminine plural agras)

  1. sour

Noun[edit]

agro m (Latin spelling)

  1. vinegar

Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

agrō

  1. dative singular of ager
  2. ablative singular of ager

References[edit]


Latvian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

agro

  1. vocative singular masculine form of agrais
  2. accusative singular masculine form of agrais
  3. instrumental singular masculine form of agrais
  4. genitive plural masculine form of agrais
  5. vocative singular feminine form of agrais
  6. accusative singular feminine form of agrais
  7. instrumental singular feminine form of agrais
  8. genitive plural feminine form of agrais

Old Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin acrus, acra, acrum, from Latin acer, acris.

Adjective[edit]

agro

  1. sour
    • 1250, anonymous, Bocados de oro 155, (as shown in the RAE's diachronic corpus, from a 1971 edition by Mechthild Crombach, for Romanisches Seminar der Universität Bonn (Bonn)):
      Si supiese [...] que se melezinaríe por comer agro, non lo usaríe comer atanto.
      If such a person knew ... that they could get cured by eating sour food, they wouldn't eat [sweet things] as much.

Descendants[edit]

  • Spanish: agro, agrio

Further reading[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈaɡɾo/, [ˈa.ɣ̞ɾo]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin ager, agrum, with first attestation in 1645. However, some dialects may have preserved it as an inherited term[1].

Noun[edit]

agro m (plural agros)

  1. field (area of agriculture)

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Spanish agro, in use until the 17th century.

Adjective[edit]

agro (feminine agra, masculine plural agros, feminine plural agras)

  1. Obsolete form of agrio.
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Venetian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin root *acrus, *acrum, from Latin ācer, acrem.

Adjective[edit]

agro m (feminine singular agra, masculine plural agri, feminine plural agre)

  1. sharp, sour
  2. acid