agro

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See also: agro- and Agro

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

agro (comparative more agro, superlative most agro)

  1. (Australia, New Zealand, UK, slang) angry
    • 2019 December, Justin Blackburn, The Bisexual Christian Suburban Failure Enlightening Bipolar Blues, page 90:
      Trolls turns to me agro/sexy. "You're a weirdo who makes others feel weird cause you don't fit in...leave!"

Anagrams[edit]

Aragonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ācer.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

agro (feminine agra, masculine plural agros, feminine plural agras)

  1. sour

References[edit]

  • agrio”, in Aragonario, diccionario castellano–aragonés (in Spanish)

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ager.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

agro (accusative singular agron, plural agroj, accusative plural agrojn)

  1. field, piece of arable land

Derived terms[edit]

  • agrara (agrarian)
  • agraro (agricultural land (of a region))

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

13th century. From Latin ager, agrum, from Proto-Italic *agros, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éǵros.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

agro m (plural agros)

  1. enclosed farmland usually comprising a single property
    • 1259, Andrés Martínez Salazar, editor, Documentos gallegos de los siglos XIII al XVI, A Coruña: Casa de la Misericordia, page 44:
      nos damos a isse Pedro Pedrez un agro que jaz sobrela egreia de Uillanoua en Seloure a chantar de pereyros et de mazeyras
      we give this Pedro Pérez a field that is over the church of Vilanova in Sillobre, for planting there pear and apple trees
  2. countryside
  3. primary sector

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • agro” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2022.
  • agro” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006–2018.
  • agro” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • agro” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • agro” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French ager, Italian agro and Spanish agro. In length from English agriculture and Russian агрикульту́ра (agrikulʹtúra).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈaɡro/
  • Hyphenation: ag‧ro

Noun[edit]

agro (plural agri)

  1. field: piece of ground

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Ultimately derived from Vulgar Latin ācrus, from Classical Latin ācrem (with a change in declension). Likely borrowed from Gallo-Italic, mostly displacing the inherited and now rare acro.[1] Doublet of acre, a borrowing from Latin.

Adjective[edit]

agro (feminine agra, masculine plural agri, feminine plural agre)

  1. sour, acidic
    • 1354, Giovanni Boccaccio, Il corbaccio[1]; republished as Nicola Bruscoli, editor, L'Ameto - Lettere - Il corbaccio, Bari: Giuseppe Laterza e figli, 1940, page 227:
      Le gelatine, la carne e ogni altra cosa acetosa o agra, perché si dice che rasciugano, erano sue nimiche mortali.
      Gelatin, meat, and all things vinegary or sour—as they are said to be astringent—were her mortal enemies.
    • 1605 [1304–1309], “Del mutamento d’una pianta in un’altra [The transformation of a plant in another]” (chapter 8), Libro secondo [Second book], in Bastiano de' Rossi, transl., Trattato dell'agricoltura [Treatise on agriculture]‎[2], Florence: Cosimo Giusti, translation of Rūrālium commodōrum librī XII by Pietro De' Crescenzi (in Medieval Latin), section 6, page 50:
      [] le salvatiche piante hanno più frutti, che le dimestiche, ma hannogli minori, e più agri.
      [ [] le salvatiche piante hanno più frutti che le dimestiche, ma hannogli minori e più agri.]
      [original: silvestrēs [plantās] habent plūrēs frūctūs quam domesticae, sed habent eōs minōrēs et ācriōrēs.]
      [] wild plants have more fruits than the domesticated ones, but they are smaller and sourer.
  2. (figurative) harsh, violent, hostile; sad, painful; hard, difficult; unpleasant; cruel, merciless; rigid
    • 13th century, Bono Giamboni, “Del consiglio che dà la Filosofia al fattore dell'opera; e come fue ricevuto per fedele. [The advice Philosophy gives to the work's author, and how it was received as truthful]” (chapter 76), in Libro de' vizî e delle virtudi [Book on vices and virtues]‎[3]; republished in Cesare Segre, editor, Il libro de' Vizî e delle virtudi e il trattato di virtù e di vizî,, Turin: Giulio Einaudi editore, 1968:
      E non ti sbigottire né abbi paura perché ti paiano ora duri i loro ammonimenti, perché molte cose paiono agre nel cominciamento, che sono molto agevoli a seguitare e compiere
      And do not be dismayed, or afraid, because their admonitions seem severe to you now, since many things, which are very easy to carry on and complete, seem hard in the beginning
    • c. 1342, Giovanni Boccaccio, Comedia delle ninfe fiorentine[4], published 1520, page lxxxv-R:
      [] il luogo da ricurui aratri:e da qualunque morſo con ſollecitudine Illeſo ſeruarono.ne uiolenta mão in quello ſanza agra punitione ſadoperaua giammai.
      [ [] il luogo da ricurvi aratri, e da qualunque morso, con sollecitudine illeso servarono; né violenta mano in quello, sanza agra punizione, s'adoperava giammai.]
      [] they earnestly kept the place untouched by curved ploughs, and by any damage; and no violence was ever perpetrated there, without harsh punishment.
  3. (figurative, very rare) irritated
  4. (figurative) lemon-coloured; lemon
  5. (obsolete, very rare) having an unpleasant colour (of gemstones)
  6. (obsolete, very rare) unrefined (of metal)
Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

agro m (uncountable)

  1. (literal and figurative, rare) sourness
  2. (lemon) juice
  3. (figurative, very rare) sadness, sorrow
  4. (figurative, very rare) dissonance, cacophony
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Accademia della Crusca (p. 1961), “agro”, in Grande dizionario della lingua italiana (in Italian), volume 1, page 269, page 270
  • agro1 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana
  1. ^ Buchi, Éva, Schweickard, Wolfgang (2008–) “*/ˈakr-u/”, in Dictionnaire Étymologique Roman, Nancy: Analyse et Traitement Informatique de la Langue Française.

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Latin agrum, from Proto-Italic *agros, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éǵros.

Noun[edit]

agro m (plural agri)

  1. countryside around a town

Further reading[edit]

  • Accademia della Crusca (p. 1961), “agro”, in Grande dizionario della lingua italiana (in Italian), volume 1, page 270
  • agro2 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Anagrams[edit]

Ladino[edit]

Adjective[edit]

agro (Latin spelling, feminine agra, masculine plural agros, feminine plural agras)

  1. sour

Noun[edit]

agro m (Latin spelling)

  1. vinegar

Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

agrō

  1. dative/ablative singular of ager

References[edit]

Latvian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

agro

  1. inflection of agrais:
    1. vocative/accusative/instrumental singular masculine/feminine
    2. genitive plural masculine/feminine

Old Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin ācrus, ācra, ācrum, from Latin ācer, ācris.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

agro

  1. sour
    • 1250, anonymous, Bocados de oro 155, (as shown in the RAE's diachronic corpus, from a 1971 edition by Mechthild Crombach, for Romanisches Seminar der Universität Bonn (Bonn)):
      Si supiese [...] que se melezinaríe por comer agro, non lo usaríe comer atanto.
      If such a person knew ... that they could get cured by eating sour food, they wouldn't eat [sweet things] as much.

Descendants[edit]

  • Spanish: agro, agrio

Further reading[edit]

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈaɡɾo/ [ˈa.ɣ̞ɾo]
  • Rhymes: -aɡɾo
  • Syllabification: a‧gro

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin agrum, with first attestation in 1645. However, some dialects may have preserved it as an inherited term.[1]

Noun[edit]

agro m (plural agros)

  1. field (area of agriculture)

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Inherited from Old Spanish agro, in use until the 17th century.

Adjective[edit]

agro (feminine agra, masculine plural agros, feminine plural agras)

  1. Obsolete form of agrio.
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Venetian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin ācrus, from Latin ācer (with a change in declension), from Proto-Italic *akris, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ḱrós (sharp).

Adjective[edit]

agro (feminine singular agra, masculine plural agri, feminine plural agre)

  1. sharp, sour
  2. acid