for-

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English for-, vor-, from Old English for-, fer-, fær-, fyr- ‎(far, away, completely, prefix), from the merger of Proto-Germanic *fra- ("away, away from"; see fro, from) and *fur-, *far- ‎(through, completely, fully), from Proto-Indo-European *pro-, *per-, *pr-. Cognate with Scots for-, West Frisian fer-, for-, Dutch ver-, German ver-, Swedish för-, Danish for-, Norwegian for-, Latin per-. More at for.

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

for-

  1. (no longer productive) Meaning "far", "away"; "from", "out" e.g. forbid, forget, forsay; forbear, fordeem.
  2. (no longer productive) Meaning "completely", "to the fullest extent" e.g. fordo; superseded by combinations with "up" in senses where no upward movement is involved, e.g. forgive = give up (one's offenses), forgather = "gather up", forbeat = "beat up", etc.
  3. (dialectal) Very; excessively.
    forolded ‎(very old)
    fornigh ‎(very near)

Derived terms[edit]


See also[edit]


French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French, from Old French for-, partially from Late Latin forīs, taken as an adaptation of the Late Latin adverb forīs ‎(outdoors, outside) and used to calque Frankish words prefixed by *fur- ‎(for-) (compare Late Latin foris facere ‎(to do wrong) = Old High German firwirken ‎(to do wrong), Late Latin forisfactus ‎(evil deed) = Gothic 𐍆𐍂𐌰𐍅𐌰𐌿𐌷𐍄𐍃 ‎(frawauhts, evil deed), Late Latin foris consiliare ‎(to mislead) = Old High German firleitan ‎(to mislead), etc.), and partially continuing from Proto-Germanic *fur-, *fer-, *fra- ‎(away, from, off), from Proto-Indo-European *pro-, *per-, *pr-. See for-. Related to French fors ‎(except), French hors ‎(outside).

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

for-

  1. (nonproductive) prefix used to express error, exclusion, or inadequacy.

Related terms[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Prefix[edit]

for-

  1. previous, before, first, pre-
    for- + síða ‎(page) — forsíða ‎(front page)
  2. (emphatic) extremely
  3. negative meaning

Derived terms[edit]


Synonyms[edit]


Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions.

Prefix[edit]

for-

  1. over, superior, super-
  2. outer, external
  3. great, extreme

Derived terms[edit]


Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
for- fhor- bhfor-
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Prefix[edit]

for-

  1. previous, before, first, pre-
    for- + side ‎(page) — forside ‎(front page)
  2. (emphatic) extremely
  3. negative meaning

Derived terms[edit]


Synonyms[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *fer-, *fur-, *fra- ‎(away, far), from Proto-Indo-European *pro-, *per-, *pr- with a variety of meanings including ‘rejection, destruction, prohibition’. Cognate with Old Frisian for-, Old Saxon far-, for-, Dutch ver-, Old High German fir-, far- (German ver-), and, outside Germanic, with Ancient Greek περί ‎(perí), Latin per-, Old Church Slavonic пре- ‎(pre-) (Russian пере- ‎(pere-)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

for-

  1. forming verbs from verbs with various senses especially ‘wrongly, away from, astray, abstention, prohibition, perversion, destruction’
    forwyrcan ‎(to do wrong, sin)
    forstandan ‎(to defend, protect, stand for)
    forweorpan ‎(to throw away, cast away, reject)
    forstelan ‎(to steal away, deprive)
    fordēman ‎(to condemn)
    forlǣdan ‎(to mislead)
  2. used to create intensified adjectives and verbs from other adjectives and verbs, with the sense of completely or fully. Compare Modern English use of up
    forblāwan ‎(to blow up, inflate)
    forstoppian ‎(to stop up, block, occlude)
    forworen ‎(decayed, decrepit)
    forbrocen ‎(broken down, broken up)
  3. very
    forlȳtel ‎(very little)

Derived terms[edit]



Old Saxon[edit]

Prefix[edit]

for-

  1. Alternative form of far-