for-

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English for-, vor-, from Old English for-, fer-, fær-, fyr- (far, away, completely, prefix), from the merger of Proto-Germanic *fra- ("away, away from"; see fro, from) and Proto-Germanic *fur-, *far- (through, completely, fully), from Proto-Indo-European *pro-, *per-, *pr-. Cognate with Scots for-, West Frisian fer-, for-, Dutch ver-, German ver-, Swedish för-, Danish for-, Norwegian for-, Latin per-. More at for.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (stressed) IPA(key): /fɔː(ɹ)/
  • (unstressed) IPA(key): /fə(ɹ)/

Prefix[edit]

for-

  1. (no longer productive) Far, away; from, out.
    forbid, forget, forsay; forbear, fordeem
  2. (no longer productive) Completely; to the fullest extent; superseded by combinations with up in senses where no upward movement is involved, e.g. forgive = "give up (one's offenses)", forgather = "gather up", forbeat = "beat up".
    forbreak
  3. (dialectal, obsolete) Very; excessively.
    forolded (very old)
    fornigh (very near)

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse for-, from Proto-Germanic *fra-.

Prefix[edit]

for-

  1. Makes verbs from adjectives meaning "to cause to be [adjective]".
    for- + ‎skøn (beautiful) + ‎-e (infinitive suffix) → ‎forskønne (beautify)
    for- + ‎sød (sweet) + ‎-e → ‎forsøde (sweeten)
    for- + ‎uren (unclean) + ‎-e → ‎forurene (pollute)
  2. Denotes initial or preparatory action; pre-.
    for- + ‎bore (drill) → ‎forbore (drill a hole for screwing)
    for- + ‎arbejde (work) → ‎forarbejde (preparatory work)

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French [Term?], from Old French for-, partially from Late Latin forīs, taken as an adaptation of the adverb forīs (outdoors, outside) and used to calque Frankish words prefixed by *fur- (for-) (compare Late Latin foris faciō (to do wrong) = Old High German firwirken (to do wrong), forisfactus (evil deed) = Gothic 𐍆𐍂𐌰𐍅𐌰𐌿𐍂𐌷𐍄𐍃 (frawaurhts, evil deed), foris coⁿsilio (to mislead) = Old High German firleitan (to mislead), etc.), and partially continuing from Proto-Germanic *fur-, *fer-, *fra- (away, from, off), from Proto-Indo-European *pro-, *per-, *pr-. See for-. Related to French fors (except), French hors (outside).

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

for-

  1. (nonproductive) prefix used to express error, exclusion, or inadequacy

Related terms[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse for-, from Proto-Germanic *fra-.

Prefix[edit]

for-

  1. previous, before, first, pre-
    for- + ‎síða (page) → ‎forsíða (front page)
  2. (emphatic) extremely
  3. negative meaning

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Terms derived from for- meaning “before”
Terms derived from for- used emphatically
Terms derived from for- used to imbue a negative meaning

Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *uɸor-.

Prefix[edit]

for-

  1. over, superior, super-
  2. outer, external
  3. great, extreme

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
for- fhor- bhfor-
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Prefix[edit]

for-

  1. previous, before, first, pre-
    for- + ‎side (page) → ‎forside (front page)
  2. (emphatic) extremely
  3. negative meaning

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Terms derived from for- meaning “before”
Terms derived from for- used emphatically
Terms derived from for- used to imbue a negative meaning

Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *fra-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

for-

  1. wrongly, away from, astray, abstention, prohibition, perversion, destruction (verbal prefix)
    forwyrcanto do wrong, sin
    forstandanto defend, protect, stand for
    forweorpanto throw away, cast away, reject
    forstelanto steal away, deprive
    fordēmanto condemn
    forlǣdanto mislead; seduce
  2. used to create intensified adjectives and verbs from other adjectives and verbs, with the sense of completely or fully; compare Modern English use of up
    forblāwanto blow up, inflate
    forbrecanto break up, break into pieces
    forstoppianto stop up, block, occlude
    forworendecayed, decrepit
  3. very
    forlȳtelvery little

Usage notes[edit]

  • This prefix was almost always unstressed, in both nouns and verbs.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle English: far-, fer-, for-

Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *uɸor-. Prefix form of for.

Prefix[edit]

for-

  1. over-

Derived terms[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Prefix[edit]

for-

  1. Alternative form of far-