kitten

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See also: Kitten

English[edit]

A kitten.

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English kitoun, kiton, kyton (kitten), diminutive of cat (cat), equivalent to cat +‎ -en. The first element is probably from Middle English kiteling (kitten, kit), Old Norse ketlingr (kitten), or possibly Anglo-Norman *kiton or Old French chiton, diminutive of cat, chat (cat), from Late Latin cattus. Compare Low German kitten (kitten). More at kitling, cat, and -en.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

kitten (plural kittens)

  1. A young cat, especially before sexual maturity (reached at about seven months).
    • 1752 January, The London Magazine, and Monthly Chronologer, pages 243 and 244.
      It was ſuppoſed to have happened thus: the cat had young kittens, and frequently carried them mice, and other animals its prey, and among the reſt a young rat: the kittens, not being hungry, played with it, and when the cat came to give ſuck to the kittens, the rat likewiſe ſucked her.
    • 1844, , The Kitten, publ. by the Religious Tract Society, pages 1 and 2.
      To the sounds, however, I paid no attention at first as I was much interested in the subject upon which I was writing; but at length my som Richard burst into my study, exclaiming that the kitten had climbed up to the top of a young ash tree, and could not get down again.
    • 2011 December 14, Steven Morris, “Devon woman jailed for 168 days for killing kitten in microwave”, in Guardian[1]:
      Jailing her on Wednesday, magistrate Liz Clyne told Robins: "You have shown little remorse either for the death of the kitten or the trauma to your former friend Sarah Knutton." She was also banned from keeping animals for 10 years.
  2. A young rabbit, rat, hedgehog, squirrel, fox, beaver, badger, etc.
    • 1906, Joseph Henry Taylor, Beavers, Their Ways, and Other Sketches, page 49.
      The first move at beaver raising in North Dakota had its starting in the fall of 1874, when a kitten beaver was taken out of Mandan Lake by the writer and given to a little Indian girl who then lived with her guardians at Pretty Point near the present village of Sanger, Oliver county.
    • 2009, Kathryn Walker, See How Rabbits Grow, publ. by PowerKiDS press (The Rosen Publishing Group Inc.), page 10.
      Rabbit babies are called kittens or kits. The mother prepares a cosy nest for her kittens.
  3. A moth of the genus Furcula.
    • 1959, Odonata reprints: J. G. Needham collection, vol. 3, page 657.
      Two of these formed cocoons in a manner I have not seen before. They were supplied when full-grown with plenty of rotten willow wood, which I have always found a most suitable material for insects using bark or old wood in forming cocoons such as the kittens, Apatele alni, etc., and most made the usual cycle of cocoons on it.
  4. (colloquial) A term of endearment, especially for a woman.
    • 1995, Duckman, "America the Beautiful" (season 2, episode 5):
      Speak only when spoken to, kitten.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

kitten (third-person singular simple present kittens, present participle kittening, simple past and past participle kittened)

  1. To give birth to kittens.
    • 2003, Cora Linn Daniels, C. M. Stevans, Encyclopfdia of Superstitions, Folklore, and the Occult Sciences of the World:
      A cat about to kitten, must not be spoken of by its name, but called a witch. (Madagascar.)
    • 2016, Kerry Greenwood, Murder and Mendelssohn, Sydney: Allen and Unwin, page 319:
      'Princess the Lady Regina of Alphington is about to kitten. I must be there to support her.'

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English kitten.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

kitten m (plural kittens, diminutive kittentje n)

  1. a young cat; kitten
    • 2015, Joubert Pignon, "Kittens", in Paul van der Steen (ed.), Negenenhalf leven. Nieuwe en klassieke kattenverhalen, Xander Uitgevers B.V. (publ.).
      Telkens wanneer we in een huis kwamen wonen, zei ik tegen mijn vriendin dat dit geen huis voor kittens was, maar dat we ooit een huis zouden hebben dat geschikt is voor kittens. Ik hoopte dat we nooit in een huis zouden wonen dat geschikt is voor kittens.
      Each time when we began living in a house, I told my girlfriend that this was not a house for kittens, but that we would have a house one day that is appropriate for kittens. I hoped that we would never live in a house that is appropriate for kittens.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From kit (sealant) +‎ -en.

Verb[edit]

kitten

  1. (transitive) to apply sealant to
    • 1996, dr. A.M. Soeterboek & drs. L.F. Stapper, Het geneesmiddel en zijn toepassing, Bohn Stafleu van Loghum (publ., 9th ed.), page 21.
      Granulaten zijn poeders die tot kleine brokjes aan elkaar gekit zijn.
      Granulates are powders that have been adjoined to one another with sealant.
Inflection[edit]
Inflection of kitten (weak)
infinitive kitten
past singular kitte
past participle gekit
infinitive kitten
gerund kitten n
present tense past tense
1st person singular kit kitte
2nd person sing. (jij) kit kitte
2nd person sing. (u) kit kitte
2nd person sing. (gij) kit kitte
3rd person singular kit kitte
plural kitten kitten
subjunctive sing.1 kitte kitte
subjunctive plur.1 kitten kitten
imperative sing. kit
imperative plur.1 kit
participles kittend gekit
1) Archaic.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Noun[edit]

kitten

  1. Plural form of kit

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Kitt +‎ -en

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈkɪtn̩]
  • Hyphenation: kit‧ten
  • (file)

Verb[edit]

kitten (third-person singular simple present kittet, past tense kittete, past participle gekittet, auxiliary haben)

  1. to putty, to cement

Conjugation[edit]

Further reading[edit]