dun

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See also: d'un, dūn, dún, dǔn, dùn, and dün

English[edit]

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Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English dun, dunne, from Old English dunn (dun, dingy brown, bark-colored, brownish black), from Proto-Germanic *dusnaz (brown, yellow), from Proto-Indo-European *dhūw- (to smoke, raise dust). Cognate with Old Saxon dun (brown, dark), Old High German tusin (ash-gray, dull brown, pale yellow, dark).

Alternative etymology derives the Old English word from Late Brythonic (cf. Old Welsh dwnn 'dark (red)'), from Proto-Celtic *dusno (cf. Old Irish donn), from Proto-Indo-European *dwos (cf. Old Saxon dosan 'chestnut brown'). More at dusk.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dun (countable and uncountable, plural duns)

  1. (uncountable) A brownish grey colour.
    dun colour:    
Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dun (not comparable)

  1. Of a brownish grey colour.
    • Pierpont
      Summer's dun cloud comes thundering up.
    • Keble
      Chill and dun / Falls on the moor the brief November day.
Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Unknown; perhaps a variant of din.

Noun[edit]

dun (plural duns)

  1. (countable) A collector of debts.
    • Arbuthnot
      to be pulled by the sleeve by some rascally dun
    • 1933, George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London, Ch. 18:
      Melancholy duns came looking for him at all hours.
    • 1970, John Glassco, Memoirs of Montparnasse, New York 2007, p. 102:
      ‘Frank's worried about duns,’ she said as the butler went away.
  2. An urgent request or demand of payment.
    He sent his debtor a dun.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

dun (third-person singular simple present duns, present participle dunning, simple past and past participle dunned)

  1. (transitive) To ask or beset a debtor for payment.
    • Jonathan Swift
      Hath she sent so soon to dun?
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, Tom Jones, Folio Society 1973, p. 577:
      Of all he had received from Lady Bellaston, not above five guineas remained and that very morning he had been dunned by a tradesman for twice that sum.
    • 1940, Raymond Chandler, Farewell, My Lovely, Penguin 2010, p. 107:
      Rich bitches who had to be dunned for their milk bills would pay him right now.
  2. (transitive) To harass by continually repeating e.g. a request.
Translations[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dun (plural duns)

  1. A valley in the Himalayan foothills, e.g. Dehra Dun.

Etymology 4[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

dun (plural duns)

  1. (countable) A newly hatched, immature mayfly.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

See done.

Verb[edit]

dun

  1. (informal) Eye dialect spelling of done: simple past tense and past participle of do
    He dun it before and he dun it again.
    Now, ya dun it!

Etymology 6[edit]

See don’t.

Contraction[edit]

dun

  1. Eye dialect spelling of don't.

Etymology 7[edit]

Verb[edit]

dun (third-person singular simple present duns, present participle dunning, simple past and past participle dunned)

  1. (transitive) To cure, as codfish, by laying them, after salting, in a pile in a dark place, covered with saltgrass or a similar substance.

Etymology 8[edit]

See dune.

Noun[edit]

dun (plural duns)

  1. A mound or small hill.

Etymology 9[edit]

Imitative.

Interjection[edit]

dun

  1. (humorous) Imitating suspenseful music.
    • Carrie Tucker, I Love Geeks
      Has he allowed the power and the repercussions of the Death Note to influence his entire life? How would you deal with that power? (Dun, dun, DUN! Insert dramatic music here.)

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse dúnn (down).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /duːn/, [d̥uːˀn]

Noun[edit]

dun n (singular definite dunet, plural indefinite dun)

  1. down (soft, immature feathers)

Inflection[edit]

See also[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *thunni, from Proto-Germanic *þunnuz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dun (comparative dunner, superlative dunst)

  1. thin, slender
  2. sparse
  3. (liquid) runny

Declension[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

dun

  1. first-person singular present indicative of dunnen
  2. imperative of dunnen

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From contraction of preposition de (of) + masculine article un (a, one)

Contraction[edit]

dun m (feminine dunha, masculine plural duns, feminine plural dunhas)

  1. of a, of one; from a, from one

Kiput[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-North Sarawak *daqun, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *dahun (compare Malay daun).

Noun[edit]

dun

  1. leaf

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

dun

  1. rafsi of dunli.

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

dun

  1. Nonstandard spelling of dūn.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of dún.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of dǔn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of dùn.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Apparently from a Celtic source; compare Old Irish dun (hill, hill-fort), Welsh din.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dūn f

  1. hill, mountain

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

dun n

  1. down, what grows on young birds

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]