tango

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See also: tangò, tangó, and Tango

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Argentine-Spanish tango, probably from a Niger-Congo language (compare Ibibio tamgu (to dance)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Rhymes: -æŋɡəʊ

Noun[edit]

Argentine tango (dance)

tango (plural tangos or tangoes)

  1. A Standard ballroom dance in 4/4 time; or a social dance, the Argentine tango.
  2. The letter T in the ICAO spelling alphabet.
  3. (slang) enemy, used amongst special police forces, derived from the abbreviation of target using the NATO phonetic alphabet.
  4. A dark orange colour shade; deep tangerine
    tango colour:    

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

tango (third-person singular simple present tangoes, present participle tangoing, simple past and past participle tangoed)

  1. To dance the tango.
  2. (slang) To handle, to flirt with, to deal with.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

tango n

  1. tango (Standard ballroom dance in 4/4 time; or a social dance, the Argentine tango)

Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia da

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish tango.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /tanɡo/, [ˈtˢɑŋɡ̊o]

Noun[edit]

tango c (singular definite tangoen, plural indefinite tangoer)

  1. tango

Inflection[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Finnish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia fi

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈt̪ɑŋːo̞]
  • Hyphenation: tan‧go

Noun[edit]

tango

  1. tango

Declension[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tango m (plural tangos)

  1. tango (dance)

External links[edit]


Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

tango

  1. first-person singular present indicative of tangere

Noun[edit]

tango m (plural tanghi)

  1. tango

Anagrams[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

tango

  1. rōmaji reading of たんご

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *th₂g-. Cognate with Ancient Greek τεταγών (tetagṓn)[1], Old English þaccian (to touch, pat). More at thack, thwack.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

present active tangō, present infinitive tangere, perfect active tetigī, supine tāctum

  1. (transitive) I touch, grasp.
    Noli me tangere.
    Don't touch me.
  2. (transitive) I reach, arrive at.
  3. (transitive) I attain to.
  4. (transitive) I move, affect.
  5. (transitive) I come home to.

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Michiel de Vaan (2008), Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages, Leiden, Boston: Brill Academic Publishers

Portuguese[edit]

Wikipedia-logo.png
 Tango on Portuguese Wikipedia

Wikipedia pt

tango

Etymology[edit]

Argentine-Spanish tango, probably from a Niger-Congo language.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tango m (plural tangos)

  1. tango (ballroom dance)
  2. a style of music associated with the tango dance (used to accompany and set the beat for the dance)

Verb[edit]

tango

  1. first-person singular present indicative of tangar

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /tânɡo/
  • Hyphenation: tan‧go

Noun[edit]

tȁngo m (Cyrillic spelling та̏нго)

  1. tango (dance)

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia es

Noun[edit]

tango m (plural tangos)

  1. tango (ballroom dance)
  2. a style of music associated with the tango dance (used to accompany and set the beat for the dance)

Derived terms[edit]


Swahili[edit]

Noun[edit]

tango (needs class)

  1. cucumber