-id

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

PIE root
*weyd-

Variant of -oid.

Suffix[edit]

-id

  1. (not productive except in zoology) of or pertaining to; appended to various foreign words to make an English adjective or noun form. Often added to words of Greek, sometimes Latin, origin.
Derived terms[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle French -ide, French -ide, and their sources, Latin -id-, -is and Ancient Greek -ιδ-, -ις ‎(-id-, -is).

Suffix[edit]

-id

  1. (chiefly botany, astronomy) Forming nouns from Latin or Greek roots, including certain plant names modelled on Latin sources, the names of meteors (e.g. Perseid), and the names of certain dynasties (e.g. Solomonid).
  2. (biology) Forming common names of members of a taxon which has a name ending in -idae.

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

-i ‎(possessive plural) +‎ -d ‎(second-person singular personal suffix)

Pronunciation[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-id

  1. (possessive suffix) your ... -s (second-person singular informal, multiple possessions)
    kapu ‎(gate) → a kapuid ‎(your gates)
    palota ‎(palace) → a palotáid ‎(your palaces)
    érme ‎(coin) → az érméid ‎(your coins)

Declension[edit]

For back vowel words:

For front vowel words:

Usage notes[edit]

  • (possessive suffix) Variants:
    -id is added to words ending in a vowel except -i. Final -a changes to -á-. Final -e changes to -é-.
    -aid is added to back vowel words ending in a consonant
    -eid is added to front vowel words ending in a consonant
    -jaid is added to back vowel words ending in a consonant or the vowel -i
    -jeid is added to front vowel words ending in a consonant or the vowel -i

See also[edit]


Northern Sami[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Samic *-jtē, originally the partitive/ablative plural form. Cognate with the Finnish partitive plural -ja, -ia, -ita.

The genitive plural originally had the ending -i, from Proto-Samic *-j. It was eliminated in favour of the accusative ending by analogy with the singular, where these cases fell together naturally.

Suffix[edit]

-id

  1. The ending of the accusative and genitive plural.

Usage notes[edit]

This suffix triggers the weak grade on a preceding stressed syllable.


Old Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-id

  1. Forms a noun of agency.
    • from verb or verbal noun
      e.g. serc ‎(love) → sercaid ‎(lover)
    • from noun
      e.g. mucc ‎(pig) → muccaid ‎(swineherd)
      ainmm ‎(name) → ainmmnid ‎(nominative case) = "namer"

Usage notes[edit]

  • This suffix forms i-stem nouns.

Derived terms[edit]


References[edit]

  • Rudolf Thurneysen, A Grammar of Old Irish (Dublin, 1946), §267