dab

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See also: DAB, dåb, dąb, and -dab

English[edit]

Performing the dab dance move.
Dabbing hash oil.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dæb/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æb

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English dabben (to strike), probably of North Germanic origin, related to Old Icelandic dabba (to tap, slap), perhaps ultimately imitative[1]. Compare also with Middle Dutch dabben (to pinch, knead, fumble, dabble) (Dutch dabben ((of a horse) to stamp with the forelegs)), Dutch deppen (to dab), possibly German tappen (to fumble, grope).

The noun is from Middle English dabbe (a strike, blow), from the verb. Related to tap. Compare also drub, dub.

African-American sense of “playful box” perhaps influenced by dap (fistbump).

Verb[edit]

dab (third-person singular simple present dabs, present participle dabbing, simple past and past participle dabbed)

  1. (transitive) To press lightly in a repetitive motion with a soft object without rubbing.
    I dabbed my face with a towel.
  2. (transitive) To apply a substance in this way.
    He dabbed moisturizing liquid on his face.
  3. To strike by a thrust; to hit with a sudden blow or thrust.
    • 1532-1533, Thomas More, The Confutation of Tyndale's Answer
      to dabbe him in the necke
  4. (slang) To apply hash oil to a heated surface for the purpose of efficient combustion.
  5. (dance, intransitive) To perform the dab dance move, by moving both arms to one side of the body parallel with your head.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

Hash oil, aka dab.

dab (plural dabs)

  1. A soft tap or blow; a blow or peck from a bird's beak; an aimed blow.
    • 1865, Charles Dickens, Our Mutual Friend:
      I promise you nothing,' said the dolls' dressmaker, dabbing two dabs at him with her needle, as if she put out both his eyes.
    • 1917, Robert Hichens, In the Wilderness:
      Then the minute feet made feeble dabs, or stabs, at the atmosphere; the tiny fists doubled themselves and wandered to and fro as if in search of the enemy.
  2. (African-American Vernacular) A soft, playful box given in greeting or approval.
    Coordinate terms: dap, fist bump, high five
    • 2006, Greta X, Angela Pearson, Whipsdom, page 75:
      She gave a few more dabs to his buttocks. “There. By the time you've made love to me those weals will have dried up.”
    • 2010, Adrianne Byrd, Body Heat, page 177:
      The men gave each other dabs and another bear hug.
    • 2010, De'nesha Diamond, Hustlin' Divas, page 220:
      Python snickers while he gives Rufus dabs. “Do you,nigga. Do you.” That shit just makes Rufus's lips stretch wider. “You see this, Peaches? This is like the Good Housekeeping seal of approval right here.”
      page 197: I step closer to Profit and draw in a deep, steadying breath while the brothers exchange dabs. “What's up, fam? I see you finally made it.”
  3. A small amount, a blob of some soft or wet substance.
    Synonym: blob
    a dab of glue
    1. (slang) A small amount of hash oil.
  4. (chiefly in the plural, dated, Britain) Fingerprint.
  5. (dance) A hip hop dance move in which the dancer simultaneously drops the head while raising an arm, briefly resting their face in the elbow, as if sneezing into their elbow.
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Adverb[edit]

dab (not comparable)

  1. With a dab, or sudden contact.
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Perhaps corrupted from adept.

Noun[edit]

dab (plural dabs)

  1. One skilful or proficient; an expert; an adept.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:skilled person
    • c. 1759-1770?, Oliver Goldsmith, Essay
      One excels at a plan or the title page, another works away at the body of the book, and the third is a dab at an index.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Late Middle English dabbe, of unknown origin; perhaps related to sense 1 (to press against lightly) as in "a soft mass dabbed down."[2]

Noun[edit]

dab (plural dabs)

  1. A small flatfish of the family Pleuronectidae, especially Limanda limanda; a flounder.
  2. (US) A sand dab, a small flatfish of genus Citharichthys.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Back slang for bad.

Adjective[edit]

dab (comparative more dab, superlative most dab)

  1. (obsolete, costermongers) Bad.
    Synonym: trosseno
    Antonyms: doog, doogheno
    • 1851, Mayhew, Henry, “Habits and Amusements of Costermongers”, in London Labour and the London Poor[1], volume 1, page 11:
      Business topics are discussed in a most peculiar style. One man takes the pipe from his mouth and says, "Bill made a doogheno hit this morning." "Jem," says another, to a man just entering, "you'll stand a top o' reeb?" "On," answers Jem, "I've had a trosseno tol, and have been doing dab."
    • 2012, Quinn, Anthony, The Streets, →ISBN, page 33:
      One afternoon, arriving at his stall later than usual, I said, almost unknowingly, 'A doogheno or a dabheno?' Jo, who had often chaffed me for my awkward mimicking of coster language, didn't even look up from peeling his apple. 'Dab,' he said, with a little shake of his head.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2022), “dab”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.
  2. ^ Skeat, W. W. (2013). An Etymological Dictionary of the English Language. United States: Dover Publications, p. 152

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English dab.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dab m (uncountable)

  1. (dance) The dab (hip-hop dance move).

Related terms[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈdap̚]
  • Hyphenation: dab

Etymology 1[edit]

From English dub, a shortening of the word double.

Noun[edit]

dab (first-person possessive dabku, second-person possessive dabmu, third-person possessive dabnya)

  1. dub: the replacement of a voice part in a movie or cartoon, particularly with a translation; an instance of dubbing.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Arabic ضَبّ(ḍabb), from Proto-Semitic *ṣ́abb-.

Noun[edit]

dab (first-person possessive dabku, second-person possessive dabmu, third-person possessive dabnya)

  1. dabb lizard, Egyptian mastigure, Egyptian spiny-tailed lizard, Leptien's mastigure, Egyptian uromastyx, or Egyptian dabb lizard (Uromastyx aegyptia).
    Synonym: kadal gurun

Etymology 3[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

dab (first-person possessive dabku, second-person possessive dabmu, third-person possessive dabnya)

  1. a kind of mat measuring approximately 2 m, made of woven pandan leaves that are connected by stitching

Further reading[edit]


Maltese[edit]

Root
d-w-b
10 terms

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic ذَابَ(ḏāba).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dab (imperfect jdub, verbal noun dewbien or dwib or dwieb) (intransitive)

  1. to melt (become liquid, especially through warmth)
  2. to disappear
  3. to become emaciated
  4. to show tender feelings

Conjugation[edit]

    Conjugation of dab
singular plural
1st person 2nd person 3rd person 1st person 2nd person 3rd person
perfect m dobt dobt dab dobna dobtu dabu
f dabet
imperfect m ndub ddub jdub ndubu ddubu jdubu
f ddub
imperative dub dubu

Sumerian[edit]

Romanization[edit]

dab

  1. Romanization of 𒁳 (dab)

White Hmong[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dab

  1. (evil) spirit, considered responsible for epileptic attacks among other things

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Ernest E. Heimbach, White Hmong - English Dictionary (1979, SEAP Publications)

Yola[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English dabben.

Verb[edit]

dab

  1. dash, slap

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 33