lave

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English laven ‎(to wash, pour out, stream), from Old English lafian, ġelafian ‎(to pour water on, refresh, wash), from Proto-Germanic *labōną ‎(to refresh, strengthen), from Proto-Indo-European *lōbʰ- ‎(to strengthen oneself, rest). Cognate with Old Saxon lavōn ‎(to refresh, revive), Dutch laven ‎(to quench one's thirst), Old High German labōn, labian ‎(German laben, to wash, refresh), Ancient Greek λαπάζειν ‎(lapázein), ἀλαπάζειν ‎(alapázein, to empty out, cleanse; to rest, refresh). The sense of "wash" in West Germanic was reinforced due to false association with unrelated Latin lavare ‎(to wash).

Verb[edit]

lave ‎(third-person singular simple present laves, present participle laving, simple past and past participle laved)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To pour or throw out, as water; lade out; bail; bail out.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)
  2. (transitive) To draw, as water; drink in.
  3. (transitive) To give bountifully; lavish.
  4. (intransitive) To run down or gutter, as a candle.
  5. (intransitive, dialectal) To hang or flap down.
  6. (transitive, intransitive, archaic) To wash.
    • Alexander Pope
      In her chaste current oft the goddess laves.
    • 1789, William Lisle Bowles, 'Sonnet I' from Fourteen Sonnets, 1789.
      the tranquil tide, / That laves the pebbled shore.
    • 2006, Cormac McCarthy, The Road, London: Picador, 2007, p. 38.
      The boy walked out and squatted and laved up the dark water.
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English lave, laif, lafe ‎(remainder, rest, that which is left), from Old English lāf ‎(lave, remainder, rest), from Proto-Germanic *laibō ‎(remainder), from Proto-Indo-European *lip- ‎(to stick, glue). Cognate with Old High German leiba ‎(lave), Old Norse leif ‎(lave), Old English belīfan ‎(to remain). More at belive.

Noun[edit]

lave ‎(uncountable)

  1. (archaic or dialectal) The remainder, rest; that which is left, remnant; others.
    • 1885, Sir Richard Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Night 12.
      Then they set upon us and slew some of my slaves and put the lave to flight.
    • 1896 (posthumously), Robert Louis Stevenson, Songs of Travel and other verses.[1]
      Give to me the life I love,/Let the lave go by me...

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /laːvə/, [ˈlæːvə ~ ˈlæːʊ]

Adjective[edit]

lave

  1. definite of lav
  2. plural of lav

Verb[edit]

lave ‎(imperative lav, infinitive at lave, present tense laver, past tense lavede, past participle har lavet)

  1. make, create, construct, produce
  2. cook, prepare
  3. do
  4. repair, mend, fix

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lave f ‎(plural laves)

  1. (usually uncountable) lava

Verb[edit]

lave

  1. first-person singular present indicative of laver
  2. third-person singular present indicative of laver
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of laver
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of laver
  5. second-person singular imperative of laver

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Haitian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French laver ‎(wash).

Verb[edit]

lave

  1. To wash

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

lave f

  1. plural of lava

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lave

  1. definite singular of lav
  2. plural of lav

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

lave

  1. First-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of lavar
  2. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present subjunctive of lavar
  3. Third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of lavar
  4. Third-person singular (você) negative imperative of lavar

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Middle Scots lave, laif, lafe ‎(remainder, rest, that which is left), from Old English lāf ‎(lave, remainder, rest). Akin to Old High German leiba ‎(lave), Old Norse leif ‎(lave), Old English belīfan ‎(to remain). More at leave.

Noun[edit]

lave

  1. (archaic) rest, remainder.
    Ye are bit a wumman lik the lave, an ye maun thole the brunt o whit life mey bring. — Janet's Love and Service

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

lave

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of lavar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of lavar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of lavar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of lavar.

Swedish[edit]

Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia sv

lave (tower)
sauna with two benches (lave)

Noun[edit]

lave c

  1. a towerlike building atop a mine shaft
  2. a wooden bench in a sauna

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]