lave

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Lave, lavé, and låve

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /leɪv/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪv

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English laven (to wash; pour out; stream), from Old English lafian, ġelafian (to pour water on; refresh; wash), from Proto-West Germanic *labōn (to refresh; revive; strengthen), influenced, if not wholly borrowed, from Latin lavō (to wash, bathe),[1] though sometimes contentiously compared to Ancient Greek λωφάω (lōpháō, to recover, rest) of unknown origin.[2]

Verb[edit]

lave (third-person singular simple present laves, present participle laving, simple past and past participle laved)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To pour or throw out, as water; lade out; bail; bail out.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)
  2. (transitive) To draw, as water; drink in.
    • 2006, Cormac McCarthy, The Road, London: Picador, 2007, p. 38.
      The boy walked out and squatted and laved up the dark water.
  3. (transitive) To give bountifully; lavish.
  4. (intransitive) To run down or gutter, as a candle.
  5. (intransitive, dialectal) To hang or flap down.
  6. (transitive, intransitive, literary or poetic) To wash.
    • 1713, Alexander Pope, “Windsor-Forest. []”, in The Works of Mr. Alexander Pope, volume I, London: [] W[illiam] Bowyer, for Bernard Lintot, [], published 1717, OCLC 43265629:
      In her chaste current oft the goddess laves.
    • 1789, William Lisle Bowles, 'Sonnet I' from Fourteen Sonnets, 1789.
      the tranquil tide, / That laves the pebbled shore.
    • 1727, James Thomson, “Summer”, in The Seasons, London: [] A[ndrew] Millar, and sold by Thomas Cadell, [], published 1768, OCLC 642619686:
      Delicious is your shelter to the soul,
      As to the hunted hart the sallying spring,
      Or stream full-flowing, that his swelling sides
      Laves, as he floats along the herbaged brink
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English lave, laif, lafe (remainder, rest, that which is left), from Old English lāf (lave, remainder, rest), from Proto-Germanic *laibō (remainder), from Proto-Indo-European *leyp- (to stick, glue). Cognate with Old High German leiba (lave), Old Norse leif (lave), Old English belīfan (to remain). More at belive.

Noun[edit]

lave (uncountable)

  1. (archaic or dialectal) The remainder, rest; that which is left, remnant; others.
    • 1885, Sir Richard Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Night 12.
      Then they set upon us and slew some of my slaves and put the lave to flight.
    • 1896 (posthumously), Robert Louis Stevenson, Songs of Travel and other verses.[3]
      Give to me the life I love, / Let the lave go by me...
  2. (dialectal) A crowd
    • 1807, Ancient historic ballads - Page 72:
      Of prelates proud, a populous lave, And abbots boldly there were known.

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kluge, Friedrich (1989) , “laben”, in Elmar Seebold, editor, Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache [Etymological dictionary of the German language] (in German), 22nd edition, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, →ISBN, page 423: “wg. *lab-ō- swV. ‘erfrischen, waschen’”
  2. ^ Beekes, Robert S. P. (2010) , “885”, in Etymological Dictionary of Greek (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 10), with the assistance of Lucien van Beek, Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page λωφάω
  3. ^ [1]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈlaːvə/, [ˈlæːʋə], [ˈlæːʊ]
  • Rhymes: -aːvə

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse laga, derived from lag (layer). Cognate with Norwegian lage, Swedish laga.

Verb[edit]

lave (imperative lav, infinitive at lave, present tense laver, past tense lavede, perfect tense har lavet)

  1. to make, create, construct, produce
  2. to cook, prepare
  3. to do
  4. to repair, mend, fix
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Adjective[edit]

lave

  1. definite of lav
  2. plural of lav

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Noun[edit]

lave c

  1. (obsolete) dative singular indefinite of lag

Usage notes[edit]

Only used in the fixed expression af lave (out of order).


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lave f (plural laves)

  1. (usually uncountable) lava

Verb[edit]

lave

  1. inflection of laver:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Haitian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French laver (wash).

Verb[edit]

lave

  1. to wash

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

lave f

  1. plural of lava

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Verb[edit]

lave

  1. Alternative form of laven

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lave

  1. definite singular of lav
  2. plural of lav

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

lave

  1. First-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of lavar
  2. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present subjunctive of lavar
  3. Third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of lavar
  4. Third-person singular (você) negative imperative of lavar

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Middle Scots lave, laif, lafe (remainder, rest, that which is left), from Old English lāf (lave, remainder, rest). Akin to Old High German leiba (lave), Old Norse leif (lave), Old English belīfan (to remain). More at leave.

Noun[edit]

lave

  1. (archaic) rest, remainder.
    Ye are bit a wumman lik the lave, an ye maun thole the brunt o whit life mey bring. — Janet's Love and Service
    • 1789, Robert Burns, Whistle O'er The Lave O't:
      Now we're married - speir nae mair, / But whistle o'er the lave o't!
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

lave

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of lavar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of lavar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of lavar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of lavar.

Swedish[edit]

Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv
lave (tower)
sauna with two benches (lave)

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

lave c

  1. a towerlike building atop a mine shaft
  2. a wooden bench in a sauna

Declension[edit]

Declension of lave 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative lave laven lavar lavarna
Genitive laves lavens lavars lavarnas

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]