poner

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: poñer

Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pōnere, present active infinitive of pōnō.

Verb[edit]

poner

  1. to put

Conjugation[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

poner

  1. to put

Conjugation[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pōnere, present active infinitive of pōnō (whence English post and position), from Proto-Italic *posnō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

poner (first-person singular present pongo, first-person singular preterite puse, past participle puesto)

  1. (transitive, reflexive or non-reflexive) to put, to put up, to place, to lay
    Pon eso en su lugar.Put that in its place.
    Pongamos el plan a la espera por ahora.Let's put the plan on hold for now.
    Puse un anuncio en Craigslist.I put up an ad on Craigslist.
  2. (transitive) to set, to set up (e.g. set an alarm, set up chairs)
    Voy a poner la mesaI'm going to set the table.
  3. (transitive) to put on (e.g. put on a smile, a happy face, a brave face; put on a pot of coffee, put something on display)
  4. (transitive) to choose, to designate (for a job, charge or responsibility)
  5. (transitive) to make (e.g. make somebody nervous, jealous, sad, emotional, uncomfortable)
    Basta. Me estás poniendo nerviosa.Stop. You're making me nervous.
  6. (transitive) to make, to give (in certain phrases; e.g. to make available, give an injection, to give effect)
    No pongas excusas.Don't make excuses.
    Permítanme poner un ejemplo.Let me give an example.
  7. (transitive) to name, to give a nickname
    Le voy a poner Rodrigo.I will name (him) Rodrigo.
  8. (transitive) to bring (e.g. to bring online, to bring order to, to bring up to speed or date, to bring to light)
  9. (transitive) to lay (e.g. to lay eggs, lay the foundation or groundwork)
  10. (transitive) to turn, to turn on (e.g. to turn the other cheek, turn on music, to turn upside-down)
    Mi ex-esposa manipuladora puso a mis propios amigos en mi contra.
    My manipulative ex-wife turned my own friends against me.
  11. (transitive) to get (in certain phrases)
    Necesitamos ponerlos de nuestra parte.We need to get them on our side.
    ¿No arranca su coche? En unos minutos, puedo ponerlo en marcha, sin problemas.
    Your car won't start? In a few minutes, I can get it running, no problem.
  12. (transitive) to call (in certain phrases; e.g. to call into question, call into doubt, call somebody's bluff)
  13. (transitive) to pay (attention)
  14. (transitive) to draw (e.g. to draw a line or set up a boundary)
  15. (transitive) to plant, to set up (e.g. plant one's feet, plant a bomb, set up explosives, plant a bug, set up a camera, plant a weapon)
  16. (Mexico, slang) (transitive) to contribute; to bring.
    Carlos pone la casa, yo pongo los refrescos.
    Carlos contributes with his house, I contribute with beverages.
  17. (electronics) to play
    Ya se puso la canción en el radio dos veces.
    The song already played on the radio twice.
    Si Pedro pone la música demasiado fuerte, se va a quedar sordo.
    If Pedro plays music too loud, he will end up deaf.
  18. (Spain, colloquial, transitive) To turn on, make horny
    Me pones mucho.
    You really turn me on.
  19. (reflexive) to put on, to don, to change into (clothing, shoes, accoutrements)
  20. (reflexive) to get
    ¡Ponte pillo! or ¡Ponte listo!Get clever!
    ¡Ponte de rodillas!Get on your knees!
    No me gusta ponerme en frente de la cámara.I don't like getting in front of the camera.
  21. (reflexive) (of a heavenly body) to set (i.e., to sink beneath the horizon)
    Ya casi se pone el sol.Sun is about to disappear.
  22. (reflexive) to become, to get ("become" is used in reference to entering into a physical or emotional state) (e.g. become anxious, fashionable, naughty, nervous, offensive, pale, sad, serious, stern, tense, ugly, violent, weird, etc.)
    Se pone agresiva cuando alguien la toca.She gets aggressive when anyone touches her.
  23. (reflexive) to start doing something, to begin, to get down to (+ a + infinitive)
    Se sentaron a la mesa y se pusieron a hablar en voz alta.They sat down at the table and started talking loudly.
    Por lo tanto, es hora de ponernos a trabajar.So, it's time for us to get down to work.
  24. (reflexive) to put oneself
    No te pongas en peligro.Do not put yourself in harm's way.

Conjugation[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]