scald

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English scalden, from Old Northern French escalder (cf. central Old French eschauder, eschalder), from Late Latin excaldāre (bathe in hot water), from Latin ex- (off, out) + cal(i)dus (hot).[1]

Verb[edit]

scald (third-person singular simple present scalds, present participle scalding, simple past and past participle scalded)

  1. To burn with hot liquid.
    to scald the hand
    • c. 1603–1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of King Lear”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, (please specify the act number in uppercase Roman numerals), line 48, page vii:
      Mine own tears / Do scald like molten lead.
    • 1656, Abraham Cowley, Davideis
      Here the blue flames of scalding brimstone fall.
    • 1943 March and April, “Notes and News: Southern Locomotive Destroys Raider”, in Railway Magazine, page 119:
      The fireman was scalded by steam, but he did not fare so badly as the enemy pilot, whose dead body was found on a bank about 100 yd. away from the train.
  2. (cooking) To heat almost to boiling.
    Scald the milk until little bubbles form.
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun[edit]

scald (plural scalds)

  1. A burn, or injury to the skin or flesh, by hot liquid or steam.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Alteration of scall or scalled.

Noun[edit]

scald (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) Scaliness; a scabby skin disease.

Adjective[edit]

scald (comparative more scald, superlative most scald)

  1. (obsolete) Affected with the scab; scabby.
  2. (obsolete) Paltry; worthless.
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

scald (plural scalds)

  1. Alternative form of skald
    • 1820, Walter Scott, chapter I, in Ivanhoe; a Romance. [], volume III, Edinburgh: [] Archibald Constable and Co.; London: Hurst, Robinson, and Co. [], OCLC 230694662, page 28:
      The fire was spreading rapidly through all parts of the castle, when Ulrica, who had first kindled it, appeared on a turret, in the guise of one of the ancient furies, yelling forth a war-song, such as was of yore chaunted on the field of battle by the scalds of the yet heathen Saxons.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for scald in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2022), “scald”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Verb[edit]

scald

  1. first-person singular present indicative/subjunctive of scălda

Etymology 2[edit]

From French scalde.

Noun[edit]

scald m (plural scalzi)

  1. skald
Declension[edit]