Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: and
U+732B, 猫
CJK UNIFIED IDEOGRAPH-732B

[U+732A]
CJK Unified Ideographs
[U+732C]

Translingual[edit]

Stroke order
11 strokes
Stroke order
(Chinese)
Stroke order
(Japan)
Japanese
Simplified
Traditional

Han character[edit]

(Kangxi radical 94, +8, 11 strokes, cangjie input 大竹廿田 (KHTW), four-corner 44260, composition )

Derived characters[edit]

References[edit]

  • KangXi: page 714, character 27
  • Dai Kanwa Jiten: character 20535
  • Dae Jaweon: page 1127, character 1
  • Hanyu Da Zidian (first edition): volume 2, page 1352, character 1
  • Unihan data for U+732B


Chinese[edit]

Glyph origin[edit]

Phono-semantic compound (形聲, OC *mrew): semantic + phonetic (OC *mrew).

Definitions[edit]

For pronunciation and definitions of – see (“cat; to hide oneself; etc.”).
(This character, , is the simplified and variant form of .)
Notes:

Japanese[edit]

Japanese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ja

Kanji[edit]

(common “Jōyō” kanji)

Readings[edit]

Compounds[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Kanji in this term
ねこ
Grade: S
kun’yomi

⟨neko1/neko/

From Old Japanese. Cognate with Miyako にか (nika, cat, Tarama and Minna dialects) via unknown Japonic substratum.

A comparison of accent patterns between the dialects shows some confusion:

  • One group of dialects behaves as if <LF> was the Heian Kyoto accent pattern: many dialects with the Tokyo type accent, including the standard Japanese in Tokyo, pronounce this word with an <HL(L)> pitch pattern, and in some non-mainstream Keihan type dialects as well, this word has a corresponding <LF> pitch pattern.
  • Another group of dialects behaves as if <LL> was the Heian Kyoto accent pattern: the mainstream Keihan type dialects pronounce this word with an <HL> pitch pattern, and in a few of the Tokyo type dialects, this word has a corresponding <LH(L)> pitch pattern.

As a result, this term is one example of words that have the same pitch accent pattern between Tokyo and Osaka/Kyoto. The confusion seems to be due to an impression that the term comes from a compound word origin.

One theory explains that neko is shortened from earlier (ねこま) (nekoma), but neko has a first appearance in literature earlier than that for nekoma.

First attested in the 新訳華厳経音義私記 (Shin'yaku Kegonkyō Ongi Shiki) of 794.

794, Shin'yaku Kegonkyō Ongi Shiki
猫狸 [...] ニ又漢云野貍、倭言上尼古、下多〻既
Cat and raccoon dog, [...] both of them are called 野貍 (yari) in Chinese; the former is called 尼古 (⟨neko1 → neko) while the latter is called 多〻既 (⟨tatake2 → tatake) in Japanese.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

(ねこ) (neko (counter )

  1. [from 794] a cat
    (ねこ)()(ひき)()
    Neko ga nihiki iru.
    There are two cats.
    (いえ)(ねこ)(さんびき)います
    Ie ni wa neko ga sanbiki imasu.
    There are three cats in the house.
Derived terms[edit]
Idioms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Kanji in this term
ねこま
Grade: S
kun’yomi

According to the 和名類聚抄 (Wamyō Ruijushō), 931–938, (ねこ) (neko) is short for this word.

931938, Minamoto no Shitagō, Wamyō Ruijushō (book 7, page 56)
猫: 野王案、猫、音苗、禰古麻、下總本有和名二字興河海抄引此合、本草和名同訓、或省云禰古、新撰字鏡、狸、禰古、按狸一名猫、見本草和名、似虎而小、熊捕鼠為糧

One theory describes the first mora <ne> as onomatopoeia for the sound a cat makes (cf. にゃ (nya); compare English mew, meow). The last two morae <ko1ma> might accord with (くま) (kuma, bear) if it were from Proto-Japonic *kòmà, in the sense of "four-legged animal". The Heian Kyoto accent of this word is <LHL>; note that in compound words for species names, the pitch pattern may be simplised to <-HL> when the final element is a 2-mora noun, and the presence or absence of this phenomenon could explain the accent confusion in neko. (Can this(+) etymology be sourced?)

However, nekoma is first cited to 918 in the 本草和名 (Honzō Wamyō, the oldest surviving dictionary of medicine in Japan),[3] while neko is first attested in 794.

c. 918, Honzō Wamyō
家狸、一名猫、和名禰古末

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

(ねこま) (nekoma

  1. [918–???] (obsolete) a cat

References[edit]

  1. ^ 2006, 大辞林 (Daijirin), Third Edition (in Japanese), Tōkyō: Sanseidō, →ISBN
  2. ^ 1998, NHK日本語発音アクセント辞典 (NHK Japanese Pronunciation Accent Dictionary) (in Japanese), Tōkyō: NHK, →ISBN
  3. ^ 猫ま”, in 日本国語大辞典 (Nihon Kokugo Daijiten, Nihon Kokugo Daijiten)[1] (in Japanese), 2nd edition, Tōkyō: Shogakukan, 2000, →ISBN

Korean[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Chinese (MC mˠiᴇu). Recorded as Middle Korean / (myo) (Yale: myo) in Hunmong Jahoe (訓蒙字會 / 훈몽자회), 1527.

Hanja[edit]

Korean Wikisource has texts containing the hanja:

Wikisource

(eumhun 고양이 (goyang'i myo))

  1. Hanja form? of (cat).

Compounds[edit]

References[edit]

  • 국제퇴계학회 대구경북지부 (國際退溪學會 大邱慶北支部) (2007). Digital Hanja Dictionary, 전자사전/電子字典. [2]

Okinawan[edit]

Kanji[edit]

(common “Jōyō” kanji)

Readings[edit]

Compounds[edit]

Noun[edit]

(hiragana まやー, rōmaji mayā)

  1. cat

References[edit]

Yaeyama[edit]

Kanji[edit]

(hiragana まやー, romaji mayā)

Noun[edit]

(hiragana まやー, romaji mayā)

  1. cat

Yoron[edit]

Kanji[edit]

(hiragana みゃんか, romaji myanka)

Noun[edit]

(hiragana みゃんか, romaji myanka)

  1. cat