lung

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See also: lừng

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English, from Old English lungen, from Proto-Germanic *lungw- ‎(the light organ), from Proto-Indo-European *lengʷʰ- ‎(not heavy, agile, nimble); compare *h₁lengʷʰ-, whence ultimately also light. Cognate with West Frisian long, Dutch long, German Lunge, Danish lunge, Swedish lunga, Icelandic lunga, and also Russian лёгкое ‎(ljógkoje) (lung), Ancient Greek ἐλαφρός ‎(ἐlafrós, light in weight) and perhaps Albanian lungë ‎(blister, bulge). Compare Latin levis and Old English lēoht (Modern English light). See also lights ("lungs").

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lung ‎(plural lungs)

  1. (anatomy) A biological organ that extracts oxygen from the air.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 7, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      I made a speaking trumpet of my hands and commenced to whoop “Ahoy!” and “Hello!” at the top of my lungs. […] The Colonel woke up, and, after asking what in brimstone was the matter, opened his mouth and roared “Hi!” and “Hello!” like the bull of Bashan.

Synonyms[edit]

  • (organ): (in the plural) bellows (informal or archaic), (in the plural) lights (of an animal, used as food)

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the Latin adjective longus ‎(long).

Adjective[edit]

lung m

  1. long

Declension[edit]

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Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the Latin adjective longus ‎(long), from Proto-Indo-European *dl̥h₁gʰós ‎(long).

Adjective[edit]

lung 3 nom/acc forms

  1. long
    Asta e o stradă foarte lungă!
    This is a really long street!

Declension[edit]


Antonyms[edit]

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Romansch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin longus.

Adjective[edit]

lung m (feminine singular lunga, masculine plural lungs, feminine plural lungas)

  1. long