stan

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See also: Stan, -stan, and śtan

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Blend of stalker and fan. Influenced by the 2000 Eminem song "Stan," a fictional account of the rapper's encounter with an obsessive, mentally unstable fan.

Noun[edit]

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stan (plural stans)

  1. (slang, sometimes pejorative) An extremely loyal and obsessed fan, particularly one whose fixation with a celebrity is unhealthy or intrusive.

Hypernyms[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from South Proto-Slavic *stanъ (lodging) (compare Bulgarian стан (stan) ‘camp’, Serbo-Croatian ста̑н (stȃn) ‘appartment’); Romanian stână and Greek στάνη (stáni) also from Slavic.

Noun[edit]

stan m

  1. shepherd's hut
  2. pen (for sheep)

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stan m

  1. tent

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *stāną.

Verb[edit]

stān

  1. to stand

Descendants[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *stainaz, from Proto-Indo-European *stāino-, *stī-no- (a suffixed form of *stāi- (to be solid, to crowd together)); cognate with Old Frisian stēn, Old Saxon stēn, Old Dutch stein (Dutch steen), Old High German stein (German Stein), Old Norse steinn (Danish and Swedish sten), Gothic 𐍃𐍄𐌰𐌹𐌽𐍃 (stains). The Indo-European root is also the source of Ancient Greek στῖον (stîon, pebble), Slavic *stēnā- (Bulgarian and Russian стена (stena), Czech stěna (wall)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stān m

  1. stone

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *stāną.

Verb[edit]

stān

  1. to stand

Conjugation[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stan m

  1. state (of affairs), condition
  2. state (political division of the United States)
  3. (rare) state (sovereign polity)

Declension[edit]

External links[edit]

  • stan” in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *stanъ, from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂- (to stand, stay), whence also stȁti (to stand), stȁviti (to set, place), stȁdo (herd) and stȏl (table).

Noun[edit]

stȃn m (Cyrillic spelling ста̑н)

  1. flat, apartment
  2. loom (tkàlačkī stȃn)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Quotations[edit]

References[edit]

  • stan” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Swedish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Contraction of staden, definite singular of stad.

Noun[edit]

stan

  1. (colloquial) the town, the city
    stan
    downtown

Usage notes[edit]

  • Stockholmers insist that stan always refers to Stockholm and no other cities. The phrase inte i stan (not in the town) to them means outside of Stockholm, but to other Swedes it means outside of any town, i.e. in the countryside.