ain

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See also: Ain, -ain, and áin

Alemannic German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

ain m

  1. (cardinal) one

See also[edit]

  • ai (feminine)
  • ais (neuter)

Finnish[edit]

Noun[edit]

ain

  1. Instructive plural form of aa.

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

ain

  1. Romanization of 𐌰𐌹𐌽

Inari Sami[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ain

  1. always
  2. still

Malay[edit]

ain

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic عَيْن ‎(ʿayn), from Proto-Semitic *ʿayn-, from Proto-Afro-Asiatic *ʿayVn-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ain ‎(Jawi spelling عين)

  1. (anatomy) eye (organ)

Synonyms[edit]


Manx[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ain

  1. first-person plural of ec (at us)
  2. (idiomatically) our

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

ain m ‎(plural ains)

  1. (Jersey) fishhook

Synonyms[edit]


Northern Sami[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ain

  1. still

Old Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

·ain

  1. third-person singular future / present subjunctive conjunct of aingid

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

ain

  1. second-person singular imperative of aingid

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
ain unchanged n-ain
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Pohnpeian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowing from English iron, from Middle English iren, a rhotacism of Old English īsern, īsærn, īren, īsen, from Proto-Germanic *īsarną, from Gaulish īsarno-, from Proto-Celtic *īsarno-, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ēsh₂r̥no- ‎(bloody, red), from *h₁ésh₂r̥ ‎(blood).

Noun[edit]

ain

  1. flatiron, clothes iron

Verb[edit]

ain

  1. (intransitive) (neutral) to iron

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowing from English irons

Noun[edit]

ain

  1. handcuffs, shackles, irons
    Polis kin doadoahngki ain.
    Policemen use handcuffs.

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English aȝen, from Old English āgen, ǣġen ‎(one's own), or possibly from Old Norse eiginn ‎(own). More at own.

Adjective[edit]

ain

  1. Belonging to, or on behalf of, a specified person (especially oneself); own.
    Ma ain dear sister ― My own dear sister