ain

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See also: Ain, áin, aiŋ, -ain, a in, ain', and ain-

Alemannic German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German ein, from Old High German ain, from Proto-West Germanic *ain, from Proto-Germanic *ainaz. Cognate with German ein, Dutch een, English one, an, Swedish en.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

ain m (feminine ai, neuter ais)

  1. one

Biem[edit]

Noun[edit]

ain

  1. woman

Further reading[edit]

  • Malcolm Ross, Proto Oceanic and the Austronesian Languages of Western Melanesia, Pacific Linguistics, series C-98 (1988)
  • Stephen Adolphe Wurm, New Guinea Area Languages and Language Study (1976)

Finnish[edit]

Noun[edit]

ain

  1. Instructive plural form of aa.

Adverb[edit]

ain

  1. (poetic) Synonym of aina

Anagrams[edit]


Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

ain

  1. Romanization of 𐌰𐌹𐌽

Inari Sami[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Adverb[edit]

ain

  1. always
  2. still

Further reading[edit]

  • Koponen, Eino; Ruppel, Klaas; Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002-2008) Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[1], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland

Ingrian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *aina. Cognates with Estonian aina and Finnish aina

Adverb[edit]

ain

  1. always, on and on

Italian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Romanization of Arabic عَيْن(ʿayn), from Proto-Semitic *ʿayn- (eye).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈajn/
  • Hyphenation: àin

Noun[edit]

ain m or f (invariable)

  1. ayin
    1. The name of the Arabic-script letter ع‎
    2. The name of the Hebrew-script letter ע
    3. The name of the Phoenician-script letter 𐤏
    4. The name of the Syriac-script letter ܥ

References[edit]

  • ain in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Malay[edit]

ain

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic عَيْن(ʿayn), from Proto-Semitic *ʿayn-, from Proto-Afroasiatic *ʿayVn-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ain (Jawi spelling عين‎, plural ain-ain, informal 1st possessive ainku, impolite 2nd possessive ainmu, 3rd possessive ainnya)

  1. (anatomy) eye (organ)

Synonyms[edit]


Manx[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ain

  1. first-person plural of ec (at us)
  2. (idiomatically) our

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

ain m (plural ains)

  1. (Jersey) fishhook

Synonyms[edit]


Northern Sami[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.) Related to Lule Sami ájn.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈajn/

Adverb[edit]

ain

  1. still
  2. even
  3. yet

Further reading[edit]

  • Koponen, Eino; Ruppel, Klaas; Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002-2008) Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[2], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland

Old High German[edit]

Numeral[edit]

ain

  1. (Alemannic) Alternative form of ein

Old Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

·ain

  1. third-person singular future/present subjunctive conjunct of aingid

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

ain

  1. second-person singular imperative of aingid

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
ain unchanged n-ain
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Pohnpeian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English iron, from Middle English iren, a rhotacism of Old English īsern, īsærn, īren, īsen, from Proto-Germanic *īsarną, from Gaulish īsarno-, from Proto-Celtic *īsarno-, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ēsh₂r̥no- (bloody, red), from *h₁ésh₂r̥ (blood).

Noun[edit]

ain

  1. flatiron, clothes iron

Verb[edit]

ain

  1. (intransitive) (neutral) to iron

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English irons.

Noun[edit]

ain

  1. handcuffs, shackles, irons
    Polis kin doadoahngki ain.
    Policemen use handcuffs.

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English aȝen, from Old English āgen, ǣġen (one's own), or possibly from Old Norse eiginn (own), from Proto-Germanic *aiganaz (own). More at own.

Adjective[edit]

ain

  1. Belonging to, or on behalf of, a specified person (especially oneself); own.
    Ma ain dear sisterMy own dear sister
    Clap, clap handies / Mammie's wee, wee, ain.

Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English iron.

Noun[edit]

ain

  1. iron; steel

Yucatec Maya[edit]

Noun[edit]

ain

  1. Obsolete spelling of áayin