ain

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See also: Ain, áin, -ain, a in, ain', and ain-

Alemannic German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

ain m

  1. (cardinal) one

See also[edit]

  • ai (feminine)
  • ais (neuter)

Biem[edit]

Noun[edit]

ain

  1. woman

References[edit]

  • Stephen Adolphe Wurm, New Guinea Area Languages and Language Study (1976)
  • Malcolm Ross, Proto Oceanic and the Austronesian Languages of Western Melanesia (1988)

Finnish[edit]

Noun[edit]

ain

  1. Instructive plural form of aa.

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

ain

  1. Romanization of 𐌰𐌹𐌽

Inari Sami[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology Scriptorium.

Adverb[edit]

ain

  1. always
  2. still

Malay[edit]

ain

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic عَيْن ‎(ʿayn), from Proto-Semitic *ʿayn-, from Proto-Afro-Asiatic *ʿayVn-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ain ‎(Jawi spelling عين)

  1. (anatomy) eye (organ)

Synonyms[edit]


Manx[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ain

  1. first-person plural of ec (at us)
  2. (idiomatically) our

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology Scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

ain m ‎(plural ains)

  1. (Jersey) fishhook

Synonyms[edit]


Northern Sami[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology Scriptorium.

Adverb[edit]

ain

  1. still
  2. even
  3. yet

Old Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

·ain

  1. third-person singular future / present subjunctive conjunct of aingid

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

ain

  1. second-person singular imperative of aingid

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
ain unchanged n-ain
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Pohnpeian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowing from English iron, from Middle English iren, a rhotacism of Old English īsern, īsærn, īren, īsen, from Proto-Germanic *īsarną, from Gaulish īsarno-, from Proto-Celtic *īsarno-, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ēsh₂r̥no- ‎(bloody, red), from *h₁ésh₂r̥ ‎(blood).

Noun[edit]

ain

  1. flatiron, clothes iron

Verb[edit]

ain

  1. (intransitive) (neutral) to iron

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowing from English irons

Noun[edit]

ain

  1. handcuffs, shackles, irons
    Polis kin doadoahngki ain.
    Policemen use handcuffs.

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English aȝen, from Old English āgen, ǣġen ‎(one's own), or possibly from Old Norse eiginn ‎(own). More at own.

Adjective[edit]

ain

  1. Belonging to, or on behalf of, a specified person (especially oneself); own.
    Ma ain dear sister‎ ― My own dear sister