s-

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Abbreviation of scalar (particle with spin 0).

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

s-

  1. (physics) subatomic particles with a spin (quantum angular momentum) of 0, predicted by supersymmetry; the bosonic equivalent of known fermions

Etymology 2[edit]

Abbreviation of sec- (secondary).

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

s-

  1. (organic chemistry) secondary form
    Synonym: sec-
    Coordinate terms: (normal form) n-, (tertiary form) t-
Derived terms[edit]

Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin sē- (without).

Prefix[edit]

s-

  1. separately, astray
  2. without

Derived terms[edit]


Cayuga[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Prefix[edit]

s-

  1. second person agent pronominal prefix; you

References[edit]

  • Marianne Mithun; Reginald Henry (1982) Wadęwayę́stanih - A Cayuga Teaching Grammar, 3rd edition, Woodland Cultural Centre, published 2015, page 54

Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

s used as a prefix.

Prefix[edit]

s-

  1. A prefix, usually indicating either movement together or movement downwards.
  2. Direction from top down
    s- + ‎jít → ‎sejít
    Sešel dolů.He came down.
  3. Direction toward the middle
    s- + ‎jít → ‎sejít
    Sejdeme se zítra.We will gather tomorrow.

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • s- in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • s(e)- in Slovník afixů užívaných v češtině, 2017

Egyptian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Afroasiatic *s- (causative prefix).

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

s
  1. Used to form a causative verb from a non-causative verb.

Alternative forms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • James P[eter] Allen (2010) Middle Egyptian: An Introduction to the Language and Culture of Hieroglyphs, 2nd edition, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, page 157.

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

In most cases, this prefix stems from Latin ex- (see ex). In some cases, it stems from Latin dis-.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

s-

  1. Used to form words that have an opposing sense: un-, in-
    s- + ‎fatto (done”, “made) → ‎sfatto ((of a bed) unmade)
  2. Used to form verbs that have a sense of undoing an action: de-, dis-, un-
    s- + ‎gancio (hook) → ‎sganciare (to unhook)
    s- + ‎borsa (bag) → ‎sborsare (to disburse)
  3. Used to express a pejorative sense
    s- + ‎bocca (mouth) → ‎sboccato (foul-mouthed)
  4. Used to form verbs with a sense of exit, separation: dis-, ex-, trans-
    s- + ‎buco (hole) → ‎sbucare (to pop out)
    s- + ‎confine (boundary) → ‎sconfinare (to stray away from)
  5. Used in a privative sense: a-, de-, un-
    s- + ‎buccia (skin”, “peel) → ‎sbucciare (to peel)
    s- + ‎fame (hunger) → ‎sfamare (to feed”, “to satiate)
  6. Used to derive verbs from a noun, adjective or verb.
    s- + ‎bianco (white) → ‎sbiancare (to whiten or bleach).
    s- + ‎gocciola (droplet) → ‎sgocciolare (to drip).
  7. Used as an intensifier.
    s- + ‎cacciare (to hunt”, “to drive away) → ‎scacciare (to expel”, “to drive away).
  8. Reduced form of dis-
    discendere (to descend)scendere.

Usage notes[edit]

Often used to prefix words beginning with a consonant. Dis- rather than s- is often preferred before vowels.

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Migliorini, Bruno; Aldo Duro (1950), “s-”, in Prontuario etimologico della lingua italiana (in Italian), Paravia

Lushootseed[edit]

Prefix[edit]

s-

  1. Added to a verb to form a noun.
    s- + ‎ʔəɬəd (eat) → ‎sʔəɬəd (food)

Maltese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Article[edit]

s-

  1. Alternative form of il-

Usage notes[edit]

  • Used after a vowel and before the letter s. For details on usage, see the main lemma.

Mohawk[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • se- (before n-, r-, w-, and ’-stems)

Prefix[edit]

s-

  1. pronominal prefix for
    you _____

Alternative forms[edit]

- Initial consonant
Environment t/s/h/k n/r/w/’ a e/en o/on i y
Word-Initial s- se- s- s- s- ts- ts-

Prefix[edit]

s-

  1. singulative noun prefix
  2. iterative verb prefix

References[edit]

  • Gunther Michelson (1973) A thousand words of Mohawk, University of Ottawa Press, page 9
  • Nora Deering; Helga H. Delisle (1976) Mohawk: A teaching grammar (preliminary version), Quebec: Manitou College, page 146, 344

Old Irish[edit]

Prefix[edit]

s- (class A infixed pronoun, triggers nasalization in some texts but not in others)

  1. her (object pronoun)
  2. them

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Oneida[edit]

Prefix[edit]

s-

  1. second person agent pronominal prefix; you

References[edit]

  • Floyd Lounsbury (1953) Oneida Verb Morphology, Yale University Press, page 59-60

Polish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /s/
  • (file)
  • Syllabification: s

Prefix[edit]

s-

  1. Used before voiceless consonants to form a verb in a perfective aspect from a verb in an imperfective aspect.
    s- + ‎całkować → ‎scałkować
    s- + ‎chłodzić → ‎schłodzić
  2. Used before voiceless consonants to mean "in a downward direction".
    s- + ‎chodzić → ‎schodzić
  3. Used before voiceless consonants to mean "off, off the surface of", "away from", or "out of".
    s- + ‎chodzić → ‎schodzić
    Antonym: na-

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • s- in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • s- in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • sa- (before affricates, fricatives and certain consonant clusters)

Prefix[edit]

s- (Cyrillic spelling с-)

  1. Prepended to verbs, usually forming a perfective from an imperfective verb.
    s- + ‎pùstiti → ‎spùstiti
    s- + ‎znȁti → ‎sàznati
    s- + ‎lòmiti → ‎slòmiti
    s- + ‎glȅdati → ‎sàgledati
    s- + ‎kȕpiti → ‎skȕpiti
    s- + ‎klòniti → ‎sklòniti
    s- + ‎náći → ‎snȃći

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • s-” in Hrvatski jezični portal