User:Robert Ullmann/Prologue/examples/is

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  1. (verb) Third-person singular simple present indicative form of be.
  2. (Afrikaans, verb) am, are, is (present tense, all persons, plural and singular of wees, to be)
  3. (Catalan, noun) Plural of i.
  4. (Danish, noun, uncountable) ice, ice cream (water in frozen form, dessert)
  5. (Danish, noun, countable) ice, ice cream (ice cream on a stick or in a wafer cone)
  6. (Dutch, verb) The third-person singular present indicative of zijn; is.
  7. (Dutch, verb) equals
  8. (Dutch, adverb, informal, dialect) Abbreviation of eens
  9. (Hungarian, adverb) also, too, as well
  10. (Hungarian, adverb, after an interrogative word) again (used in a question to ask something one has forgotten)
  11. (Irish, conjunction) Reduced form of agus.
  12. (Irish, particle) Used with the comparative/superlative form of adjectives to form the simple comparative:
  13. (Irish, particle) Used with the comparative/superlative form of adjectives to form the superlative:
  14. (Irish, verb) Copula form, non-past of .
  15. (Latin, verb) second-person singular present active indicative of .
  16. (Latin, pronoun, demonstrative) it; he (refers to a masculine word)
  17. (Norwegian, Old English, noun) ice
  18. (Old English, noun) The runic character (/i/ or /i:/)
  19. (Portuguese, noun) Plural form of i.
  20. (Scots, adverb, South Scots) as
  21. (Scots, conjunction, South Scots) as
  22. (Scots, pronoun, South Scots) me
  23. (Scots, verb) Third-person singular simple present form of ti be
  24. (Scottish Gaelic, conjunction) and
  25. (Scottish Gaelic, verb) am, are, is
  26. (Swedish, noun, uncountable) Ice; frozen water.
  27. (Swedish, noun, countable) Ice; a sheet of ice lying on a body of water.

English[edit]

Most common English words: he « his « with « #12: is » it » for » as

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *isti, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ést (is). The paradigm of "to be" has been since the time of Proto-Germanic a synthesis of three originally distinct verb stems. The infinitive form "to be" is from *bʰuH- (to become). The words "is" and "are" are both derived from *h₁es- (to be) Lastly, the past forms starting with "w-" such as "was" and "were" are from *h₂wes- (to reside).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

is

  1. Third-person singular simple present indicative form of be.
    He is a doctor. He retired some time ago.
    Should he do the task, it is vital that you follow him.

Quotations[edit]

For examples of the usage of this term see the citations page.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]



Afrikaans[edit]

Verb[edit]

is

  1. am, are, is (present tense, all persons, plural and singular of wees, to be)

Catalan[edit]

Noun[edit]

is f. pl.

  1. Plural of i.

Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

is c. (singular definite isen, plural indefinite is)

  1. (uncountable) ice, ice cream (water in frozen form, dessert)
  2. (countable) ice, ice cream (ice cream on a stick or in a wafer cone)

Inflection[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

is

  1. The third-person singular present indicative of zijn; is.
  2. equals
    Twaalf min drie is negentwelve minus three equals nine

Adverb[edit]

is

  1. (informal, dialect) Abbreviation of eens

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate of és (and).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

is

  1. also, too, as well
  2. (after an interrogative word) again (used in a question to ask something one has forgotten)
    Hogy is hívják? (What's that called, again?)

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Expressions



Irish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From agus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

is

  1. Reduced form of agus.

Etymology 2[edit]

Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁es- (to be).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA: [ɪsˠ], [sˠ] (before nouns and adjectives)
  • IPA: [ʃ] (before pronouns é, í, ea, iad)

Particle[edit]

is

  1. Used with the comparative/superlative form of adjectives to form the simple comparative:
  1. Used with the comparative/superlative form of adjectives to form the superlative:
Usage notes[edit]
  • Used to form either the comparative or superlative:
an buachaill is mó -- the larger boy, the largest boy
  • Note: the thing compared is introduced by :
Is mó an buachaill ná Séamus -- The boy is bigger than James;
  • Note the use as a superlative:
Is é Séamus an buachaill is mó in Éirinn! -- James is the biggest boy in Ireland! (lit. "It is James (who is) the boy (who) is biggest in Ireland")
See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

is

  1. Copula form, non-past of .
Usage notes[edit]
  • Used in present and future sentences for identification or definition of a subject as the person/object identified in the predicate of the sentence:
  • Is múinteoir é Dónall. (definition: predicate is indefinite)
Dónall is a teacher.
  • Is é Dónall an múinteoir. (identification: predicate is definite)
Dónall is the teacher.
  • Sometimes used with noun or adjective predicates, especially in certain fixed idiomatic phrases. It is not a substantive verb.
I can swim.
I like tea.
See also[edit]
  • ba (used in past and conditional sentences)

Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Inflected form of  (go).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

īs


  1. second-person singular present active indicative of .

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *éy, *íh₂, *íd (the).

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

is m.; (f. ea, n. id, pl. ei)

  1. (demonstrative) it; he (refers to a masculine word)
    Is ad me rescripsit.
    He wrote to me again.
Declension[edit]

Irregular: similar to first and second declensions, except for singular genitives ending in "-ius" and singular datives ending in "-ī".

Number Singular Plural
Case \ Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative is ea id , eae ea
genitive eius eius eius eōrum eārum eōrum
dative eīs eīs eīs
accusative eum eam id eōs eās ea
ablative eīs eīs eīs

See also[edit]



Norwegian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse íss.

Noun[edit]

is m. (definite singular isen; uncountable)

  1. ice



Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *īsa- from Proto-Indo-European *ei-, *ī- (ice, frost). Cognate with Old Frisian īs, Old Saxon īs (Dutch ijs), Old High German īs (German Eis), Old Norse íss (Swedish is). There are parallels in many Iranian languages, apparently from the same IE root: Avestan 𐬀𐬉𐬑𐬀 (aēxa-), frost, ice), Persian یخ (yakh), Pashto جح (jaḥ), Ossetian их.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

īs n.

  1. ice
    • the Legend of St Andrew
      Ofer eastreamas is brycgade.
      The ice formed a bridge over the streams.
  2. The runic character (/i/ or /i:/)

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]



Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

is

  1. Plural form of i.
    • 2003, J. K. Rowling, Lya Wyler, Harry Potter e a Ordem da Fênix, Rocco, page 411:
      Se você pôs os pingos nos is e cortou os tês então pode fazer o que quiser!
      If you've dotted your I's and crossed your T's, then you can do whatever you want!

Scots[edit]

Adverb[edit]

is (not comparable)

Positive
is

Comparative
not comparable

Superlative
none (absolute)


  1. (South Scots) as

Synonyms[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

is


  1. (South Scots) as

Synonyms[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

is personal, non-emphatic

  1. (South Scots) me

See also[edit]

  • A
  • mei (emphatic variant)

Verb[edit]

is

  1. Third-person singular simple present form of ti be

See also[edit]



Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

is

  1. and

Synonyms[edit]

Verb[edit]

is

  1. am, are, is

Usage notes[edit]

  • This defective verb doesn't have the infinitive, future tense, subjunctive or conditional moods.
  • The dependent form, used after particles, is e.
  • Is is used when linking the subject of a sentence with an object ("somebody is somebody", "somebody is something", "something is something"), otherwise forms of the verb bi are used:
    Is mise Dòmhnall. - I am Donald.
    Tha mise ann an taigh-seinnse. - I am in a pub.

Derived terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse íss.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Inflection for is Singular Plural
common Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Base form is isen isar isarna
Possessive form is isens isars isarnas

is c. (uncountable and countable)

  1. (uncountable) Ice; frozen water.
  2. (countable) Ice; a sheet of ice lying on a body of water.