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# {{context|transitive|lang=en}} To [[anathematise]]; [[pronounce]] an ecclesiastical [[curse]] upon; place under a ban.
 
# {{context|transitive|lang=en}} To [[anathematise]]; [[pronounce]] an ecclesiastical [[curse]] upon; place under a ban.
 
# {{context|transitive|lang=en}} To [[curse]]; [[execrate]].
 
# {{context|transitive|lang=en}} To [[curse]]; [[execrate]].
#: {{rfquotek|Spenser}}
+
#* {{rfquotek|Spenser}}
#: {{rfquotek|Sir Walter Scott}}
+
#* {{rfquotek|Sir Walter Scott}}
 
# {{context|transitive|lang=en}} To [[prohibit]]; [[interdict]]; [[proscribe]]; [[forbid]] or block from participation.
 
# {{context|transitive|lang=en}} To [[prohibit]]; [[interdict]]; [[proscribe]]; [[forbid]] or block from participation.
#: ''Bare feet are '''banned''' in this establishment''.
+
#* {{rfquotek|Byron}}
#: {{rfquotek|Byron}}
+
#* {{quote-news|year=2011|date=December 14|author=Steven Morris|work=Guardian
#* {{quote-news
+
|title=[http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/dec/14/woman-killed-kitten-microwave-jail Devon woman jailed for 168 days for killing kitten in microwave]
|year=2011
 
|date=December 14
 
|author=Steven Morris
 
|title=Devon woman jailed for 168 days for killing kitten in microwave
 
|work=Guardian
 
|url=http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/dec/14/woman-killed-kitten-microwave-jail
 
|page=
 
 
|passage=Jailing her on Wednesday, magistrate Liz Clyne told Robins: "You have shown little remorse either for the death of the kitten or the trauma to your former friend Sarah Knutton." She was also '''banned''' from keeping animals for 10 years.}}
 
|passage=Jailing her on Wednesday, magistrate Liz Clyne told Robins: "You have shown little remorse either for the death of the kitten or the trauma to your former friend Sarah Knutton." She was also '''banned''' from keeping animals for 10 years.}}
  +
#*{{quote-magazine|date=2013-08-10|volume=408|issue=8848|magazine={{w|The Economist}}
  +
|title=[http://www.economist.com/news/leaders/21583277-worlds-biggest-polluter-going-green-it-needs-speed-up-transition-can-china21583270-new-zealands-plan-regulate-designer-drugs-better-trying-ban-them-and-failing-new A new prescription]
  +
|passage=No sooner has a [synthetic] drug been blacklisted than chemists adjust their recipe and start churning out a subtly different one. These “legal highs” are sold for the few months it takes the authorities to identify and '''ban''' them, and then the cycle begins again.}}
  +
#: {{usex|lang=en|Bare feet are '''banned''' in this establishment.}}
 
# {{context|intransitive|lang=en}} To curse; [[utter]] curses or maledictions.
 
# {{context|intransitive|lang=en}} To curse; [[utter]] curses or maledictions.
   

Revision as of 03:26, 29 September 2013

English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle English bannen, from Old English bannan (to summon, command, proclaim, call out), from Proto-Germanic *bannaną (curse, forbid), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰa- (to say). Cognate with Dutch bannen (to ban, exile, discard), German bannen (to exile, to exorcise, captivate, excommunicate), Swedish banna (to ban, scold), Armenian բան (ban) and perhaps Albanian banoj (to reside, dwell).

Verb

ban (third-person singular simple present bans, present participle banning, simple past and past participle banned)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To summon; call out.
  2. (transitive) To anathematise; pronounce an ecclesiastical curse upon; place under a ban.
  3. (transitive) To curse; execrate.
    • (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)
    • (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Walter Scott to this entry?)
  4. (transitive) To prohibit; interdict; proscribe; forbid or block from participation.
    • (Can we find and add a quotation of Byron to this entry?)
    • 2011 December 14, Steven Morris, “Devon woman jailed for 168 days for killing kitten in microwave”, Guardian:
      Jailing her on Wednesday, magistrate Liz Clyne told Robins: "You have shown little remorse either for the death of the kitten or the trauma to your former friend Sarah Knutton." She was also banned from keeping animals for 10 years.
    • 2013 August 10, “A new prescription”, The Economist, volume 408, number 8848: 
      No sooner has a [synthetic] drug been blacklisted than chemists adjust their recipe and start churning out a subtly different one. These “legal highs” are sold for the few months it takes the authorities to identify and ban them, and then the cycle begins again.
    Bare feet are banned in this establishment.
  5. (intransitive) To curse; utter curses or maledictions.
Synonyms
Translations

Noun

ban (plural bans)

  1. prohibition
  2. A public proclamation or edict; a summons by public proclamation. Chiefly, in early use, a summons to arms.
    Bans is common and ordinary amongst the Feudists, and signifies a proclamation, or any public notice.
  3. The gathering of the (French) king's vassals for war; the whole body of vassals so assembled, or liable to be summoned; originally, the same as arrière-ban: in the 16th c., French usage created a distinction between ban and arrière-ban, for which see the latter word.
    He has sent abroad to assemble his ban and arriere ban.
    The Ban and the Arrierban are met armed in the field to choose a king.
    France was at such a Pinch..that they call'd their Ban and Arriere Ban, the assembling whereof had been long discussed, and in a manner antiquated.
    The ban was sometimes convoked, that is, the possessors of the fiefs were called upon for military services.''
    The act of calling together the vassals in armed array, was entitled ‘convoking the ban.
Related terms
Translations

See also

Etymology 2

Borrowing from Romanian of uncertain origin, perhaps from Serbo-Croatian bân

Noun

ban (plural bani)

  1. A subdivision of currency, equal to a 1/100th of a Romanian leu
  2. A subdivision of currency, equal to a 1/100th of a Moldavian леу
Translations

Etymology 3

From Banburismus; coined by Alan Turing.

Noun

ban (plural bans)

  1. A unit measuring information or entropy based on base-ten logarithms, rather than the base-two logarithms that define the bit.
Derived terms
Synonyms
See also

Etymology 4

From South Slavic ban (cf. Serbo-Croatian bȃn), itself a borrowing from a Turkic language, probably from the Avar word [script?] (bajan, ruler of the horde), a derivation of the Proto-Turkic *bāj- (rich, noble).

Noun

ban (plural bans)

  1. A title used in several states in central and south-eastern Europe between the 7th century and the 20th century.
Translations

Anagrams


Dutch

Pronunciation

Noun

ban m (plural bannen)

  1. excommunication, denunciation
  2. anathema which is cast upon one who is excommunicated
  3. magic spell
  4. (archaic) exile

Verb

ban

  1. first-person singular present indicative of bannen
  2. imperative of bannen

French

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Old French, from Frankish *ban.

Noun

ban m (plural bans)

  1. (dated) public declaration
  2. (dated) announcement of a marriage
  3. (East of France, Belgium) territory
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Borrowing from Serbo-Croatian bȃn. See English ban.

Noun

ban m (plural bans)

  1. ban (nobleman)

Haitian Creole

Etymology

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Verb

ban

  1. give

Synonyms


Indonesian

Etymology

Borrowing from Dutch band ("band, connection, tire/tyre").

Noun

ban

  1. tyre / tire

Irish

Pronunciation

Noun

ban f pl

  1. genitive plural of bean

Mutation

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
ban bhan mban
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Japanese

Romanization

ban

  1. rōmaji reading of ばん

Lojban

Rafsi

ban

  1. rafsi of bangu.

Mandarin

Romanization

ban

  1. Nonstandard spelling of bān.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of bǎn.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of bàn.

Usage notes

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Mapudungun

Noun

ban (using Raguileo Alphabet)

  1. death

Verb

ban (using Raguileo Alphabet)

  1. To die.
  2. First-person singular realis mood form of ban; I died; I have died.

Conjugation


References

  • Wixaleyiñ: Mapucezugun-wigkazugun pici hemvlcijka (Wixaleyiñ: Small Mapudungun-Spanish dictionary), Beretta, Marta; Cañumil, Dario; Cañumil, Tulio, 2008.

O'odham

Noun

ban

  1. coyote

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *bainą. Cognate with Old Frisian bēn (West Frisian bien), Old Saxon bēn (Low German been, bein), Dutch been (bone, leg), Old High German bein (German Bein (leg)), Old Norse bein (Icelandic bein (bone)).

Pronunciation

Noun

bān n (nominative plural bān)

  1. bone

Descendants


Old Irish

Alternative forms

Verb

ban

  1. first-person plural imperative of is

Polish

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Noun

ban m

  1. ban (a subdivision of currency)
Declension

Etymology 2

Borrowing from English ban.

Noun

ban m

  1. ban (on the Internet)
Declension
Derived terms

Etymology 3

Borrowing from Serbo-Croatian ban, from Turkish bajan.

Noun

ban m

  1. ban (title)
Declension

Romanian

Etymology

Unknown.

Noun

ban m (plural bani)

  1. money; coin

Declension

Usage notes

Usually used in the plural form, bani

See also


Serbo-Croatian

Pronunciation

Noun

bȃn m (Cyrillic spelling ба̑н)

  1. ban (title)

Declension


Vietnamese

Noun

ban

  1. time


Volapük

Etymology

Borrowing from French bain.

Noun

ban (plural bans)

  1. bath

Declension


Welsh

Noun

ban m

  1. peak

Mutation

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
ban fan man unchanged