awake

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English awaken, from Old English awacan, from a- (intensive prefix) + wacan (wake). Compare Saterland Frisian woak (awake), German Low German waak (awake), German wach (awake).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

awake (comparative more awake, superlative most awake) (predicative only)

  1. Not asleep; conscious.
  2. (by extension) Alert, aware.

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Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

awake (third-person singular simple present awakes, present participle awaking, simple past awoke or (rare) awaked, past participle awoken or (rare) awaked or (rare) awoke)

  1. (intransitive) To become conscious after having slept.
    • Salvador Dalí (1904-1989):
      Each morning when I awake, I experience again a supreme pleasure - that of being Salvador Dali.
  2. (transitive) To cause (somebody) to stop sleeping.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter primum, in Le Morte Darthur, book XVII:
      Thenne she called the heremyte syre Vlfyn I am a gentylwoman that wold speke with the knyght whiche is with yow / Thenne the good man awaked Galahad / & badde hym aryse and speke with a gentylwoman that semeth hath grete nede of yow / Thenne Galahad wente to her & asked her what she wold
  3. (transitive) to excite or to stir up something latent.
  4. (transitive, figuratively) To rouse from a state of inaction or dormancy.
  5. (intransitive, figuratively) To come out of a state of inaction or dormancy.

Synonyms[edit]

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Translations[edit]

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See also[edit]

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