kua

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See also: Kua, kúa, kuà, kuā, Küa, kuǎ, and ku'a

Hawaiian[edit]

Noun[edit]

kua

  1. (anatomy) back
  2. burden

Verb[edit]

kua

  1. to chop

Kikuyu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Hinde (1904) records kukua (or kuite) as equivalents of English die in “Jogowini dialect” of Kikuyu, listing also “Nganyawa dialect” (spoken then in Kitui District) of Kamba kugua as its equivalent.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

kua (infinitive gũkua)

  1. to die[2]
  2. to break into pieces, to fall into pieces[2]

Derived terms[edit]

(Proverbs)

Related terms[edit]

(Nouns)

(Adjectives)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hinde, Hildegarde (1904). Vocabularies of the Kamba and Kikuyu languages of East Africa, pp. 18–19. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Barlow, A. Ruffell (1960). Studies in Kikuyu Grammar and Idiom, p. 49.

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

kua

  1. Nonstandard spelling of kuā.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of kuǎ.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of kuà.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Noun[edit]

kua m, f

  1. definite feminine singular of ku

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse kúga. Akin to English cow.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

kua (present tense kuar, past tense kua, past participle kua, passive infinitive kuast, present participle kuande, imperative ku/kua)

  1. to cow, subdue

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

kua f

  1. singular definite of ku

References[edit]


Papiamentu[edit]

Determiner[edit]

kua

  1. which

Sulung[edit]

Noun[edit]

kua

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Roger Blench, Mark Post, (De)classifying Arunachal languages: Reconstructing the evidence (2011)