skew

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

A bridge with a skew arch (adjective sense 1) at Monkhide, Herefordshire, England, United Kingdom. The faces of the arch are not perpendicular to its abutments.
In this rectangular parallelepiped, the lines AD and B1B are skew (adjective sense 2) – although they are not parallel to each other, they do not intersect because they are in different planes.

Etymology 1[edit]

The verb is derived from Middle English skeuen, skewe, skewen (to run at an angle or obliquely; to escape), from Old Northern French escuer [and other forms], variants of Old French eschuer, eschever, eschiver (to escape, flee; to avoid) (modern French esquiver (to dodge (a blow), duck; to elude, evade; to slip away; to sidestep)),[1][2] from Frankish *skiuhan (to dread; to avoid, shun), from Proto-Germanic *skiuhijaną (to frighten). The English word is cognate with Danish skæv (crooked, slanting; skew, wry), Norwegian skjev (crooked, lopsided; oblique, slanting; distorted), Saterland Frisian skeeuw (aslant, slanting; oblique; awry), and is a doublet of eschew.

The adjective and adverb are probably derived from the verb and/or from askew,[3] and the noun is derived from either the adjective or the verb.[4]

Verb[edit]

skew (third-person singular simple present skews, present participle skewing, simple past and past participle skewed)

  1. (transitive) To form or shape in an oblique way; to cause to take an oblique position.
    Antonym: unskew
    1. (statistics) To cause (a distribution) to be asymmetrical.
  2. (transitive) To bias or distort in a particular direction.
    A disproportionate number of female subjects in the study group skewed the results.
  3. (transitive, Northumbria, Yorkshire) To hurl or throw.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:throw
  4. (intransitive) To move obliquely; to move sideways, to sidle; to lie obliquely.
    • L'Estrange
      Child, you must walk straight, without skewing.
  5. (intransitive) To jump back or sideways in fear or surprise; to shy, as a horse.
  6. (intransitive) To look at obliquely; to squint; hence, to look slightingly or suspiciously.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Beaumont and Fletcher to this entry?)
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Adjective[edit]

skew (not generally comparable, comparative skewer or more skew, superlative skewest or most skew)

  1. (not comparable) Neither parallel nor at right angles to a certain line; askew.
  2. (not comparable, geometry) Of two lines in three-dimensional space: neither intersecting nor parallel.
  3. (comparable, statistics) Of a distribution: asymmetrical about its mean.
    • 2014, Alex Ely Kossovsky, “Saville Regression Measure”, in Benford’s Law: Theory, the General Law of Relative Quantities, and Forensic Fraud Detection Applications, Singapore: World Scientific Publishing, →ISBN, section 3 (Data Compliance Tests), page 137:
      A slope value over 1 indicates that digits are skewer than the Benford condition in favor of low ones. A slope value less than 1 indicates that digits are less skewed as compared with the Benford condition.
    • 2016, Bettina Hüttenrauch, “Analysis of Data Augmentation KPIs”, in Targeting Using Augmented Data in Database Marketing: Decision Factors for Evaluating External Sources, Wiesbaden: Springer Gabler, DOI:10.1007/978-3-658-14577-4, →ISBN, section 6.4.3 (Model Lift (Uniform)), page 199:
      The skewest possible distribution is that in which every but one target value has only one element and the other target value has all the other elements.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Adverb[edit]

skew (comparative more skew, superlative most skew)

  1. (rare) Askew, obliquely; awry.

Noun[edit]

skew (plural skews)

  1. Something that has an oblique or slanted position.
  2. An oblique or sideways movement.
  3. A bias or distortion in a particular direction.
    • 1989, Ivan Andonovic, ‎Deepak Uttamchandani, Principles of Modern Optical Systems (volume 1, page 501)
      One application for which an optical filter can play an important role is that of a wideband connection with low time skew.
  4. (electronics) A phenomenon in synchronous digital circuit systems (such as computers) in which the same sourced clock signal arrives at different components at different times.
  5. (statistics) A state of asymmetry in a distribution; skewness.
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Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English skeu, skew (stone with a sloping surface forming the slope of a gable, offset of a buttress, etc.) [and other forms], from Anglo-Norman eschu, escuwe, eskeu, or Old Northern French eschieu, eskieu, eskiu,[5] from Old French escu, escut, eschif (a shield) (modern French écu), from Latin scūtum (a shield),[6] from Proto-Indo-European *skewH- (to cover, protect) or *skey- (to cut, split).

Noun[edit]

skew (plural skews)

  1. (architecture) A stone at the foot of the slope of a gable, the offset of a buttress, etc., cut with a sloping surface and with a check to receive the coping stones and retain them in place; a skew-corbel.
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From an earlier form of Old Norse ský, from Proto-Germanic *skiwją; Doublet of sky.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

skew (plural skewes)

  1. sky, air
  2. (rare) cloud
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French escu, from Latin scūtum.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

skew (plural skewes)

  1. A segment of carved stone to cover a gable with.
References[edit]