passar

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Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Vulgar Latin *passāre, from Latin passum, supine of pando (I stretch, I spread out). Compare Occitan passar, French passer, Spanish pasar, Italian passare.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

passar (first-person singular present passo, past participle passat)

  1. (intransitive) to pass, to pass by, to go by (to move past)
  2. (intransitive) to pass as, to be interpreted as
  3. (intransitive) to happen, to occur
    Synonyms: esdevenir-se, ocórrer, tenir lloc
  4. (intransitive, of time) to pass, to elapse
    Synonym: transcórrer
  5. (intransitive) to pass (to come to an end)
    Synonym: cessar
  6. (intransitive) to pass (to move or be moved from one place to another)
  7. (intransitive) to become (usually specifying both the beginning state and the ending state)
    Synonym: esdevenir
    • 2020 February 10, Daniel Bonaventura, “"Necessito abraçades i petons" ["I need hugs and kisses"]”, in Ara[1]:
      Amb el confinament feia mesos que no podia visitar-la i tinc por de passar a ser un desconegut per a la meva pròpia mare.
      With the lockdown, it's been months since I've been able to visit her and I'm afraid of becoming a stranger to my own mother.
  8. (intransitive) to pass, to go past, to go beyond
  9. (transitive) to pass, to pass through (to go past, by, over, or through)
    Synonym: travessar
  10. (transitive) to spend (to use up time)
  11. (transitive) to experience; to suffer
    passar fredto be cold
  12. (transitive) to pass, to surpass, to exceed
    Synonym: ultrapassar
  13. (transitive, intransitive, sports) to pass (to move (the ball or puck) to a teammate)
  14. (intransitive) to pass (in turn-based games, to decline to play in one's turn)
  15. (intransitive) to pass (to decline something that is offered or available)
  16. (reflexive) to go bad, to spoil

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Verb[edit]

passar

  1. to pass (move along, go along)
  2. to pass (something to someone)
  3. to pass (a law, judgment, etc.)
  4. to pass, spend (a certain time)

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn
Passar i bruk.

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Low German passer, from Old French compas.

Noun[edit]

passar m (definite singular passaren, indefinite plural passarar, definite plural passarane)

  1. a pair of compasses

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From the verb passe +‎ -ar.

Noun[edit]

passar m (definite singular passaren, indefinite plural passarar, definite plural passarane)

  1. a person tasked with keeping watch over or looking after someone.

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

passar

  1. present tense of passe

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Vulgar Latin *passāre, from passum, supine of pandō (I stretch, I spread out). Compare Catalan passar, French passer, Spanish pasar, Italian passare.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

passar

  1. to pass (by)

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese passar, from Vulgar Latin *passāre, from Latin passus, supine of pando (I stretch, I spread out). Compare Galician pasar, Spanish pasar, Italian passare, French passer, and English pass.

Pronunciation[edit]

 
  • IPA(key): (Brazil) /paˈsa(ʁ)/, [paˈsa(h)]
    • IPA(key): (São Paulo) /paˈsa(ɾ)/, [paˈsa(ɾ)]
    • IPA(key): (Rio) /paˈsa(ʁ)/, [paˈsa(χ)]
  • IPA(key): (Portugal) /pɐˈsaɾ/, [pɐˈsaɾ]

  • Hyphenation: pas‧sar

Verb[edit]

passar (first-person singular present indicative passo, past participle passado)

  1. (intransitive, or transitive with por or another positional preposition) to pass; to pass by (to move past)
    passaram treze carros.
    Thirteen cars have passed by.
    Não vi ninguém passar pela casa.
    I didn’t see anyone passing by the house.
    1. (transitive) to overtake (to move ahead of)
      O piloto tentou passar o outro carro.
      The pilot tried to overtake the other car.
    2. (transitive with de or with no preposition) to cross (to move beyond)
      Se passarmos da fronteira, podemos ser presos.
      If we pass the border, we could be arrested.
    3. (transitive with de) to cross; to pass; to go over (to become greater in value than)
      O preço da maçã passou de trinta centavos durante a seca.
      The price an apple went over thirty cents during the drought.
      Você já passou dos limites!
      You have crossed the line!
    4. (intransitive, or transitive with por) to go through (to move from one end through to the other side)
      A flecha passou pelo seu coração.
      The arrow went through his heart.
    5. (transitive with em or de or por) to pass (to go unheeded or neglected)
      Sementes não passam no portão do aeroporto.
      Seeds don’t pass the airport gate.
    6. (transitive with em or a locational pronoun) to stop by (to pay a brief visit)
      Passarei na casa da mãe antes de ir embora.
      I’ll stop by mother’s before I leave.
  2. (transitive or ditransitive, with the indirect object taking para or a or indirect objective pronoun) to pass (to move something over to)
    Alguém me passa o leite?
    Can someone pass me the milk?
    1. (sports, intransitive, transitive or ditransitive, with the indirect object taking para or a or indirect objective pronoun) to pass
      O técnico quer que eu passe para os atacantes.
      The coach wants me to pass to the strikers.
  3. (intransitive) to pass (to be over)
    Demorou anos para a dor nas minhas costas passar.
    It took years for the pain in my back to go away.
    A época do plantio passou.
    The time for planting has passed.
    1. (of time, intransitive, sometimes takes a reflexive pronoun) to pass; to elapse
      Passaram(-se) vinte minutos.
      Twenty minutes had passed.
  4. (auxiliary with a and a verb in the impersonal infinitive) to begin to; to start to; usually referring to something habitual
    Depois do acidente, passei a aproveitar a vida.
    After the accident, I started to enjoy life.
  5. (transitive) to spend (to stay somewhere during a given time)
    Passara uma semana no hospital.
    She had spent one week in the hospital.
  6. (auxiliary with a verb phrase in the present participle) to spend (to do something during a given time)
    Prefiro passar o dia vendo televisão.
    I prefer spending the day watching television.
  7. (transitive, takes a reflexive pronoun) to take place; to happen; to occur
    Parece que se passou algo sério nessa estrada.
    It looks like something serious took place in this street.
  8. (intransitive) to pass (to advance through the stages necessary to become valid or effective)
    O pagamento no cartão não passou.
    The payment with the card didn’t pass.
    1. (intransitive, or transitive with de) to pass (to successfully complete an academic term)
      Estudei e mesmo assim não passei.
      I studied but I still didn’t pass.
      Meu filho idiota não passará da quinta série.
      My stupid son won’t pass fifth grade.
    2. (intransitive, or transitive with em) to pass (to successfully complete an academic course, subject or test)
      São poucos que passam no vestibular.
      Few people pass the university admittance test.
      Querem que eu passe a geografia.
      They want me to pass geography.
    3. (transitive) to pass (to make a student pass a term or course)
      O professor não quis passar seus alunos mais preguiçosos.
      The professor didn’t want to pass his lazier students.
    4. (intransitive) to pass (to be passable, good enough, acceptable)
      A pizza deles não é lá excelente, mas passa.
      Their pizza isn’t that excellent, but it passes.
  9. (transitive) to iron (to unwrinkle clothing using an iron)
    Ela mandou a empregada passar o terno.
    She told the maid to iron the suit.
  10. (transitive) to spread; to apply (to rub evenly on a surface)
    Passem protetor nos seus rostos.
    Apply sunscreen on your faces.
  11. (transitive with por) to go through; to undergo; to experience
    Haviam passado por muita miséria quando crianças.
    They had experienced a lot of misery when they were children.
  12. (with the adverb bem or mal, intransitive) to be in a given situation of health
    Não se preocupe, eu passo bem.
    Don’t worry, I am fine.
  13. (transitive) to pass; to spread (to put in circulation)
    Começaram a passar rumores.
    They started spreading rumours.
  14. (takes a reflexive pronoun, transitive with por) to impersonate (to pretend to be something in order to deceive)
    O bandido está se passando por vítima para fugir daqui.
    The criminal is pretending to be a victim to get out of here.
  15. (games, intransitive, transitive) to pass (to decline to play on one’s turn)
    “É a sua vez.” “Passo.”
    “It’s your turn.” “I pass.”
    Por que você passou a sua vez?
    Why did you skip your turn?
  16. (Portugal, informal) (takes a reflexive pronoun) to freak out, to go crazy
    Como assim vais sair com esta tempestade sem agasalho? Estás-te a passar?What do you mean you're going out in this storm without a coat? Are you going crazy?
    Ela passou-se de vez.She went off the deep end.

Conjugation[edit]

Quotations[edit]

For quotations using this term, see Citations:passar.

Synonyms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

passar (first-person singular present passo, first-person singular preterite passé, past participle passado)

  1. Obsolete spelling of pasar

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

passar

  1. indefinite plural of pass

Verb[edit]

passar

  1. present tense of passa.

Anagrams[edit]