heft

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See also: Heft and Hëft

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): /hɛft/
  • Rhymes: -ɛft

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English heft, derived from Middle English heven (to lift, heave), equivalent to heave +‎ -t (-th). For development, compare English weft from weave, cleft from cleave, theft from thieve, etc.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

heft (countable and uncountable, plural hefts)

  1. (uncountable) Weight.
    • 1859, Thomas Hughes, Tom Brown at Oxford
      a man of his age and heft
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 5, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Of all the queer collections of humans outside of a crazy asylum, it seemed to me this sanitarium was the cup winner. […] When you're well enough off so's you don't have to fret about anything but your heft or your diseases you begin to get queer, I suppose.
  2. Heaviness, the feel of weight; heftiness.
    A high quality hammer should have good balance and heft.
    • 2014 September 7, Natalie Angier, “The Moon comes around again [print version: Revisiting a moon that still has secrets to reveal: Supermoon revives interest in its violent origins and hidden face”, in The New York Times[1]:
      Unlike most moons of the solar system, ours has the heft, the gravitational gravitas, to pull itself into a sphere.
    • 2021 March 30, J. B. MacKinnon, “An Entire Group of Whales Has Somehow Escaped Human Attention”, in The Atlantic[2]:
      he skull was an awkward armload. Bizarrely, its size, shape, and long, narrow bill brought to mind the head of Big Bird from Sesame Street, but with none of bird-bone’s lightness: It had heft and density.
  3. The act or effort of heaving; violent strain or exertion.
  4. (US, dated, colloquial) The greater part or bulk of anything.
    • (Can we find and add a quotation of J. Pickering to this entry?)
    The heft of the crop was spoiled.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

heft (third-person singular simple present hefts, present participle hefting, simple past and past participle hefted)

  1. (transitive) To lift up; especially, to lift something heavy.
    He hefted the sack of concrete into the truck.
  2. (transitive) To test the weight of something by lifting it.
  3. (obsolete) past participle of heave
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

From English and Scots dialect, ultimately from Old Norse hefð (possession, statute of limitations, prescriptive right) (compare Old Norse hefða (to acquire prescriptive rights)), from Proto-Germanic *habiþō, equivalent to have +‎ -t (-th). Cognate with Scots heft, heff (an accustomed pasture).

Noun[edit]

heft (plural hefts)

  1. (Northern England) A piece of mountain pasture to which a farm animal has become hefted (accustomed).
  2. An animal that has become hefted thus.
  3. (West of Ireland) Poor condition in sheep caused by mineral deficiency.

Verb[edit]

heft (third-person singular simple present hefts, present participle hefting, simple past and past participle hefted)

  1. (transitive, Northern England and Scotland) To make (a farm animal, especially a flock of sheep) accustomed and attached to an area of mountain pasture.

Etymology 3[edit]

From German Heft (notebook).

Noun[edit]

heft (plural hefts)

  1. A number of sheets of paper fastened together, as for a notebook.
  2. A part of a serial publication.
    • 1900, The Nation Volume 70
      The size of "hefts" will depend on the material requiring attention, and the annual volume is to cost about 15 marks.

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch hefte, from Old Dutch *hefti, from Proto-Germanic *haftiją. Forms with -cht- were dominant in Middle Dutch.

Noun[edit]

heft n (plural heften, diminutive heftje n)

  1. handle of a knife or other tool, haft, hilt
  2. (metaphor, used absolutely: het heft) control, charge
    Zij heeft hier het heft in handen.She runs the show here.
    Synonyms: gevest, handgreep
Alternative forms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

heft

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of heffen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of heffen

Northern Kurdish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Iranian *haptá, from Proto-Indo-Iranian *saptá, from Proto-Indo-European *septḿ̥. Compare Avestan 𐬵𐬀𐬞𐬙𐬀(hapta), Persian هفت(haft), Ossetian авд (avd), Pashto اووه(uwə).

Numeral[edit]

heft

  1. seven

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the verb hefte.

Noun[edit]

heft n (definite singular heftet, indefinite plural heft, definite plural hefta)

  1. encumberment

Verb[edit]

heft

  1. imperative of hefta and hefte

References[edit]


Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hefð.

Noun[edit]

heft

  1. A piece of mountain pasture to which a farm animal has become hefted.
  2. An animal that has become hefted thus.

Verb[edit]

heft (third-person singular present hefts, present participle heftin, past heftit, past participle heftit)

  1. (transitive) The process by which a farm animal becomes accustomed to an area of mountain pasture.