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U+C608, 예
HANGUL SYLLABLE YE
Composition: +
Dubeolsik input:d-P

[U+C607]
Hangul Syllables
[U+C609]

Korean[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]





여 ←→ 오

Syllable[edit]

(ye)

  1. A Hangul syllabic block made up of and .

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [je̞ː]
  • Phonetic hangeul: []
Revised Romanization? ye
Revised Romanization (translit.)? ye
McCune–Reischauer? ye
Yale Romanization? yēy

Interjection[edit]

(ye)

  1. (formal) yes
    , 남자사람입니다.
    Ye, namjaneun saramimnida.
    Yes, men are people.
See also[edit]
  • (ne) (polite)
  • (eung) (plain)
  • (eo) (plain)

Usage notes[edit]

Korean has a number of words for "yes". (ye) is highly polite and formal (appropriate in an interview), (ne) is polite but less formal (appropriate in a conversation with parents), and (eung) and (eo) are plain and non-formal (appropriate in a conversation with friends).

Etymology 3[edit]

Sino-Korean word from (example)

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (rye) (North Korea)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [je̞ː]
  • Phonetic hangeul: []
Revised Romanization? ye
Revised Romanization (translit.)? ye
McCune–Reischauer? ye
Yale Romanization? yēy

Noun[edit]

(ye) (hanja )

  1. example
    들자, 주일킬로그램감량하는 현실적이지 않습니다.
    Yereul deuljamyeon, ilju-ire okillogeuraemeul gamnyanghaneun geoseun hyeonsiljeogiji anseumnida.
    For example, losing 5 kilograms in a week is not a realistic goal.
Usage notes[edit]

This is often formatted as "예)" in textbooks and literature.

Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Sino-Korean word from (manners)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [je̞]
  • Phonetic hangeul: []
Revised Romanization? ye
Revised Romanization (translit.)? ye
McCune–Reischauer? ye
Yale Romanization? yey

Noun[edit]

(ye) (hanja )

  1. manners, courtesy

Etymology 5[edit]

First attested in the Yongbi eocheonga (龍飛御天歌 / 용비어천가), 1447, as Middle Korean  (Yale: nyey).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [je̞ː]
  • Phonetic hangeul: []
Revised Romanization? ye
Revised Romanization (translit.)? ye
McCune–Reischauer? ye
Yale Romanization? yēy

Noun[edit]

(ye)

  1. the past, old times
    부터 우리나라동방예의지국(東方禮儀)으로 알려져왔다.
    Yerobuteo urinaraneun dongbang-ye-uijigugeuro allyeojyeowatda.
    Since the ancient times, Korea has been known for having courteous people.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 6[edit]

First attested in the Seokbo sangjeol (釋譜詳節 / 석보상절), 1447, as Middle Korean 이ᅌᅦ (Yale: i.ngey). Contraction of 여기 (yeogi, “here”).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [je̞]
  • Phonetic hangeul: []
Revised Romanization? ye
Revised Romanization (translit.)? ye
McCune–Reischauer? ye
Yale Romanization? yey

Pronoun[edit]

(ye)

  1. here
    어디라고 감히 찾아와!
    Yega eodirago gamhi chajawa!
    How dare you show up here! Where do you think here is!
See also[edit]
Korean demonstratives edit
Determiner 어느
Pronoun Human 이이 그이 저이
이분 그분 저분 어느 분
이자 그자 저자
이놈 그놈 저놈 어느 놈
이년 그년 저년 어느 년
Object () () 어느
이것 그것 저것 어느
이거 그거 저거 어느
Place 여기 거기 저기 어디
이곳 그곳 저곳 어느 곳
Direction 이쪽 그쪽 저쪽 어느
Time 이때 그때 접때 언제
Verb 이러다 그러다 저러다 어쩌다
이리하다 그리하다 저리하다 어찌하다
Adjective 이렇다 그렇다 저렇다 어떻다
이러하다 그러하다 저러하다 어떠하다
Adverb 이리 그리 저리 어찌
이렇게 그렇게 저렇게 어떻게
이만큼 그만큼 저만큼 얼마만큼(얼만큼)

Etymology 7[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [je̞]
  • Phonetic hangeul: []
Revised Romanization? ye
Revised Romanization (translit.)? ye
McCune–Reischauer? ye
Yale Romanization? yey

Particle[edit]

(ye)

  1. (Gyeongsang) (Sentence-final particle for verbs and adjectives in the 해요체 (haeyoche, “polite”) speech level)
    haeyedoes
Synonyms[edit]
  • (standard Korean) (yo)

Middle Korean[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Native Korean word, from reconstructed Old Korean *yeli (Japanese). First attested in Hangul form in the Yongbi eocheon'ga (龍飛御天歌 / 용비어천가), 1447. Replaced by Sino-Korean terms in all modern dialects.

Hyeseong-ga, an Old Korean or Early Middle Korean poem in the hyangchal orthography, writes the Korean word for "Japanese" as 倭理. In hyangchal, native Korean nouns are written by a sequence of two Chinese characters, the first glossing the semantic meaning of the word and the second representing the final syllable or coda consonant of the Korean word. 倭理 must thus be read as a native word with the final syllable *-li. A sound change from a bisyllabic form with the final syllable *-li into a diphthongized monosyllabic form through loss of /l~r/ is well-attested in Korean (see e.g. (nae, “stream”)), and the Old Korean form of Middle Korean (Yale: yey) can accordingly be reconstructed as *여리 *yeli.

The gradual decline of this native exonym for the Japanese can be seen in the Ildongjangyuga, a Korean-language vernacular poem composed by an emissary to Japan in 1763. This work uses the term yey seventeen times and the Sino-Korean term (, woay) forty-nine times.

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /jəj/

Noun[edit]

(Yěy)

  1. Japanese person
    • 1447, Yongbi eocheon'ga:
      請으로 온 와 싸호샤 투구 아니 밧기시면 나랏 小民을 사ᄅᆞ시리ᅌᅵᆺ가
      CHYENG-ulo won Yey-woa ssahwosya thwukwu ani paskisimyen nala-s SYWOMIN-ul salasilingiska
      If [he] had not fought the Japanese who came [here] by invitation and removed the helmet [of the Japanese general], would the poor people of the country [still] be alive?

See also[edit]