sam

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Acronym

Alternative forms[edit]

Acronym[edit]

sam

  1. Surface-to-air missile

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English sammen, samnen, from Old English samnian, ġesamnian (to collect, assemble, bring together, gather, join, unite, compose, meet, glean), from Proto-Germanic *samnōną (to gather), from Proto-Indo-European *sem- (one). Cognate with Dutch zamelen (to collect), German sammeln (to collect, gather), Swedish samla (to gather, collect), Icelandic samna (to gather, collect). More at same.

Pronunciation[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

sam (third-person singular simple present sams, present participle samming, simple past and past participle sammed)

  1. (transitive, Britain dialectal) To assemble.
  2. (transitive, Britain dialectal, of persons) To bring together; join (in marriage, friendship, love, etc.).
  3. (transitive, Britain dialectal, of things) To bring together; collect; put in order; arrange.
    • Snowden (1893)
      We sammed together all we could find.
  4. (intransitive, Britain dialectal) To assemble; come together.
  5. (transitive, Britain dialectal) To coagulate; curdle (milk).
Usage notes[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English sām (together), from Old English sāmen (together), form Proto-Germanic *samana (together), from Proto-Indo-European *sem- (together, one).

Adverb[edit]

sam (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Together

Etymology 4[edit]

From Middle English sam- (prefix), from Old English sām- (half-; partly; incompletely), from Proto-Germanic *sēmi- (half), from Proto-Indo-European *sēmi- (half). Related to semi- (via Latin).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sam (not comparable)

  1. (dialectal) Half or imperfectly done.
  2. (of food) Half-heated.
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

Possibly from Uncle Sam.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sam (plural sams)

  1. (slang) Federal narcotics agent.

Anagrams[edit]


Charrua[edit]

Numeral[edit]

sam

  1. two

References[edit]

  • El último charrúa: de Salsipuedes a la actualidad (1996)
  • Idioma español y habla criolla: Charrúas y vilelas (1968)
  • Čestmír Loukotka, ‎Johannes Wilbert (editor), Classification of South American Indian Languages (1968, Los Angeles: Latin American Studies Center, University of California), page(s) 62

Chuukese[edit]

Noun[edit]

sam

  1. father

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

sam

  1. rafsi of skami.

Mizo[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Sino-Tibetan *(t)sam.

Noun[edit]

sam

  1. hair (of the head)
  2. antenna (of insects)

Etymology 2[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sam

  1. easy, simple

Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *samos (summer) (compare Welsh haf), from Proto-Indo-European *sm̥-h₂-ó- (compare Old English sumor, Old Armenian ամառն (amaṙn)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sam m (genitive unattested, no plural)

  1. summer

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Synonyms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
sam ṡam unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • 1 sam” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *samъ, from Proto-Indo-European *somHós.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sam m (not always comparable, comparative bardziej sam, superlative najbardziej sam)

  1. (comparable) alone
  2. (not comparable) myself, yourself, himself, etc. (emphatic determiner, used similarly to "no other than" or "the very", as in "I myself")

Usage notes[edit]

  • May be also used in an adverbial meaning of "by oneself" or "on one's own", similar to English alone; in this meaning, it still behaves like an adjective grammatically, and is not comparable.

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • sam in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Rohingya[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Bengali.

Noun[edit]

sam

  1. skin

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *samъ, from Proto-Indo-European *somHós.

Adjective[edit]

sȃm (definite sȃmī, Cyrillic spelling са̑м)

  1. alone, sole
  2. the very
  3. unaided, single-handed
  4. absolute, mere, unmixed
  5. solitary, secluded
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *(j)esmь, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *esmi, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ésmi.

Verb[edit]

sȁm (Cyrillic spelling са̏м)

  1. first-person singular present tense enclitic form of biti.
    Tu sam. — I'm here.

Slovene[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *samъ, from Proto-Indo-European *somHós.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sám (not comparable)

  1. alone, sole
  2. unaided, single-handed, by oneself

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Tai Dam[edit]

Tai Dam cardinal numbers
 <  2 3 4  > 
    Cardinal : sam

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Tai *saːm (three), from Middle Chinese (MC sɑm, “three”). Cognate with Lao ສາມ (sām), ᦉᦱᧄ (ṡaam), Shan သၢမ် (saam1), Thai สาม (sǎam).

Numeral[edit]

sam (transliteration needed)

  1. three

Vietnamese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

(classifier con) sam

  1. (zoology) horseshoe crab

Zhuang[edit]

Zhuang cardinal numbers
 <  2 3 4  > 
    Cardinal : sam

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Tai *saːm (three), from Middle Chinese (MC sɑm, “three”). Cognate with Lao ສາມ (sām), ᦉᦱᧄ (ṡaam), Shan သၢမ် (saam1), Thai สาม (sǎam).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Standard Zhuang) IPA(key): /θaːm˨˦/
  • Tone numbers: sam1
  • Hyphenation: sam

Numeral[edit]

sam (old orthography sam)

  1. three