fika

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Esperanto[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fika ‎(accusative singular fikan, plural fikaj, accusative plural fikajn)

  1. (vulgar) fucking, fucken
    • 2000 January 16, Coffin, David J., “Neĝa Taglibro (komika)”, in soc.culture.esperanto, Usenet[1], message-ID <nEcg4.3600$Ef6.939221@news.shore.net>:
      Dek-kvin Dio-damnaj fikaj centimetroj da fika neĝo kaj fika neĝpluvo kaj fika glacio kaj neniu scias kia alia blanka fekaĵo falis lastanokte.
      15 goddamn fucking centimeters of fucking snow and fucking sleet and fucking ice and nobody-knows-what kind of other white shit fell last night.

Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin fīca(fig), from Latin fīcus(fig tree), from a pre-Indo European language, perhaps Phoenician [script needed](pagh, ripe fig); see fig for more.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fika f (genitive singular fiku, plural fikur)

  1. fig

Declension[edit]

Declension of fika
f1 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative fika fikan fikur fikurnar
accusative fiku fikuna fikur fikurnar
dative fiku fikuni fikum fikunum
genitive fiku fikunnar fika fikanna

Derived terms[edit]


Novial[edit]

Verb[edit]

fika ‎(past fikad, active participle fikant, passive participle fikat)

  1. render

Conjugation[edit]



Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Attested in writing from 1910 according to Nationalencyklopedins ordbok. Formed by metathesis of the syllables in the dialectal word kaffi ("coffee").

Noun[edit]

fika c

  1. The enjoyment of coffee (or tea) as a social activity.
  2. A break from work or other activities, usually with coffee or tea.
  3. A light informal snack or meal in mid-morning or mid-afternoon similar to the English concept of afternoon tea.
Declension[edit]
Inflection of fika 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative fika fikan fikor fikorna
Genitive fikas fikans fikors fikornas

Verb[edit]

fika

  1. to have fika (in all senses)
Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Attested in writing from 1527. From Old Swedish fikia ("to hurry; to eagerly strive for"). Related to Danish fige, Norwegian fikia (dialectal) and Icelandic fíkjask. According to Svenska Akademiens ordbok, it might be related to the Norwegian verb fika ("to eagerly move ones arms back and forth) and German ficken ("to rub").[1]

Verb[edit]

  1. (archaic) to strive for, to work hard; to desire, often with the preposition 'efter
    Att fika efter makt
    To desire/strive for power
  2. (archaic) to hurry

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ fika in Svenska Akademiens ordbok online.

Zulu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Verb[edit]

-fìka

  1. (intransitive) to arrive

Inflection[edit]

This verb needs an inflection-table template.