User:Eirikr/Sandbox3/ni

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Contents

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

ni

  1. (linguistics) Initialism of noun inanimate.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *nū, from Proto-Indo-European *nū̆ 'now'. Cognate to Lithuanian Module error and Sanskrit nū́ (nū́, now). Often occurs in coordination with other particles, cf. tani, nani, nime ‘id’.

Adverb[edit]

Eirikr/Sandbox3/ni

  1. now
Alternative forms[edit]

Basque[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ni

  1. I (first-person singular personal pronoun)


Breton[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *snīs (compare Old Irish sní).

Pronoun[edit]

ni

  1. we (first-person plural personal pronoun)

Catalan[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ni

  1. neither, nor

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

ni f (plural Eirikr/Sandbox3/nis)

  1. Nu; the Greek letter Ν (lowercase ν).

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse níu, from Proto-Germanic *newun, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁néwn̥ (nine).

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

ni

  1. (cardinal) nine

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Italian noi or French nous, plus the i of personal pronouns.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ni (first-person plural, accusative nin, possessive nia)

  1. we (first-person plural personal pronoun)
    Ni batis lin.
    We hit him.
  2. ourselves
    Ni diris al ni.
    We said to ourselves.



French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Middle French ny, from Old French ne, from Latin nec.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ni

  1. neither; nor

Usage notes[edit]

  • Chiefly used at least twice in the same sentence, such as ni riche, ni pauvre (neither rich nor poor)

See also[edit]


Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

ni

  1. Romanization of 𐌽𐌹

Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

ni

  1. lo!, look!
    itt van ni - look! here it is!

Ido[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ni

  1. (personal) we (first-person plural personal pronoun)

Interlingua[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French and Spanish ni, from Latin nec (and not).

Adverb[edit]

ni

  1. and not.
    Io non sape, ni vole saper (I don’t know, and I don’t want to know)
  2. Neither, nor.
    Illo ni me place ni displace (It neither pleases me nor displeases me)
  3. And, or (following a "with no" or "without").
    Nos debe resister sin aqua ni alimento (We must resist with no water or food)

Italian[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ni

  1. (informal) Neither yes nor no (a play on no and si)

Noun[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia it

ni m, f (invariable)

  1. nu (Greek letter)

Anagrams[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

Eirikr/Sandbox3/ni

  1. rōmaji reading of
  2. rōmaji reading of

Kedah Malay[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ni

  1. you sg

Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • nei (in old orthography)

Etymology[edit]

From Module error nei, from Proto-Indo-European *néy (not). Cognates include Gothic 𐌽𐌴𐌹 (nei), Lithuanian nei, Old Church Slavonic ни (ni) and Old Irish .

Adverb[edit]

  1. not, if...not, unless- an absolutely negative particle like ne so only in combinations

Derived terms[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

  1. not, that not, unless; like ne in imperative and international clauses
    Ni quid tibi hinc in spem referas.
    Vinum aliudve quid ni laudato.
    Numa constituit, ut pisces, qui squamosi non essent, ni pollucerent ... ni qui ad polluctum emerent.

Luxembourgish[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ni

  1. never

Malay[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Shortened form of ini, from Proto-Malayic *(i)ni(ʔ), from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *(i-)ni, from Proto-Austronesian *(i-)ni.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

ni

  1. this (the (thing) here)
  2. this (known (thing) just mentioned)
  3. this (known (thing) about to be mentioned)
  4. this (known (thing) that the speaker does not think is known to the audience)

Pronoun[edit]

ni

  1. this (The thing, item, etc. being indicated)

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

ni

  1. Nonstandard spelling of .
  2. Nonstandard spelling of .
  3. Nonstandard spelling of .
  4. Nonstandard spelling of .

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Chinese speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Chinese language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Navajo[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ni

  1. second person singular pronoun you
    • Shí dóó ni ayóo ałk’is niidlį́.
      You and I are really good friends.
  2. second person singular possessive pronoun yours
    • Díí naaltsoos éí ni.
      This book is yours.

Usage notes[edit]

The verb in Navajo incorporates information about person, and many sentences may thus not have explicit independent pronouns. For instance:

  • Hooghandi naniná.
  • Ni éí hooghandi naniná.

Both sentences are grammatically complete, and mean essentially the same thing: you are at home. The verb naniná is in the second-person form, so the pronoun can be safely omitted, as in the first sentence. This is similar to pronoun dropping in other languages where the verb specifies person, such as Spanish. Meanwhile, the explicit use of ni in the second sentence emphasizes that the speaker is talking about you. This can be thought of as roughly equivalent to the use of emphasis in English: while the first sentence comes across as you're at home, the second one is more like you, you're at home.

See also[edit]


Norwegian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse níu (whence also Danish ni, Icelandic níu, Faroese níggju and Swedish nio) from Proto-Germanic *newun, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁néwn̥. Cognates with Gothic 𐌽𐌹𐌿𐌽 (niun); Old English niġon (English nine); Old Frisian nigun (West Frisian njoggen); Old High German niun (German neun).

Pronunciation[edit]

Cardinal number[edit]

ni

  1. nine

Old High German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Particle[edit]

ni

  1. not

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek νῦ ()

Noun[edit]

Eirikr/Sandbox3/ni f (plural Eirikr/Sandbox3/nis)

  1. nu (the thirteenth letter of the Greek alphabet).

Romanian[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ni (dative form of noi; form of ne)

  1. to us

Usage notes[edit]

This word is used when ne (which is dative) is combined with the following accusatives:

  • îl (the accusative of el, contracted as ni-l)
  • îi (the accusative of ei, contracted as ni-i)
  • le (the accusative of ele)
  • se (the reflexive accusative of all third-person pronouns)

See also[edit]


Samoan[edit]

Article[edit]

ni

  1. some (plural indefinite article)

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *ni (nor, not), from Proto-Balto-Slavic *nej, from Proto-Indo-European *ney. Compare ni-, ne.

Particle[edit]

Eirikr/Sandbox3/ni (Cyrillic spelling ни)

  1. (emphasizes negation) even, either
    ni ja to ne znam — even I don't know that; I don't know that either
    nisam ht(j)eo ni da čujem za pr(ij)edlog — I didn't even want to listen about the proposal

Conjunction[edit]

Eirikr/Sandbox3/ni (Cyrillic spelling ни)

  1. neither, nor
    ona nije ni pametna ni(ti) marljiva — she is neither smart nor industrious
    ni traga ni glasa o .. — not a trace about ..
    ni kriv ni dužan — completely innocent


Sicilian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ni

  1. us, accusative of nuàutri
  2. us, dative of nuàutri
  3. us, reflexive of nuàutri

Inflection[edit]

nominative nuàutri
prepositional nuàutri
accusative ni
dative ni
reflexive ni
possessive nostru

See also[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin nec.

Conjunction[edit]

ni ... ni

  1. Neither ... nor.
Antonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

ni f (plural níes)

  1. nu; the Greek letter Ν, ν
Synonyms[edit]

Swahili[edit]

Verb[edit]

ni

  1. is

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Since 1661, through contraction of the Old Swedish verb suffix -(e)n and the older pronoun I, e.g. vissten I > visste ni ’did you know’. Compare Icelandic þér and þið which developed similarly.

Pronunciation[edit]

/niː/

Pronoun[edit]

ni

  1. you (plural nominative)
  2. you (second-person singular nominative formal) (capitalized Ni, rare in modern use)

Usage notes[edit]

  • Both ni and er are 2nd person plural, and are also used as the courteous or "formal" 2nd person singular (like the German Sie), capitalized (Ni, Er) or not. The use of titles an courteous forms is a political issue in Sweden. The courteous "ni" was introduced (following the pattern of e.g. French) around the year 1900, and largely abolished following a proposal in 1967 by Bror Rexed to simply use du instead. Friends of this democratic du-reform take offence when addressed with ni.

Declension[edit]


Tagalog[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

ni

  1. Of; possessive particle. Used only with personal names.
    Bisikleta ni Juan
    Juan's bicycle
  2. Objective marker for personal names—objective form of si; functional equivalent of ng.

Uzbek[edit]

Particle[edit]

ni (Cyrillic ни)

  1. accusative case marker. It is placed after the direct object of a transitive verb.
    • Men O'zbek tilini o'rganyapman.
      "I am studying Uzbek."

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *snīs (compare Old Irish sní).

Pronoun[edit]

ni

  1. us; we

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This user page lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Adverb[edit]

ni

  1. not

Zulu[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

-Eirikr/Sandbox3/ni

  1. Combining stem of nina.

See also[edit]