sol

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Contents

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin solve in the hymn for St. John the Baptist all note names were take from.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sol (uncountable)

  1. (music) The fifth step in the solfège scale of C (Ut), preceded by fa and followed by la.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowing from Latin sol (sun).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sol (plural sols)

  1. (astronomy) A solar day on Mars (equivalent to 24 hours, 39 minutes, 35 seconds).
  2. (obsolete, alchemy) gold
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Spanish sol (sun), itself from Latin sol (sun).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sol (plural sols)

  1. A Spanish-American gold or silver coin, now the main currency unit of Peru (also new sol), or a coin of this value.
    • (Can we date this quote?), M. Le Page Du Pratz, History of Louisiana:
      Three days after, the Great Sun, his brother, sent me another deer-skin of the same oil, to the quantity of forty pints. The most common sort sold this year at twenty sols a pint, and I was sure mine was not of the worst kind.

Etymology 4[edit]

An abbreviation of solution

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /sɑːl/, sɒl/, soʊl/

Noun[edit]

sol (uncountable)

  1. (physical chemistry) A type of colloid in which a solid is dispersed in a liquid.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

Borrowing from Old French sol, from Latin solidus

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sol (plural sols)

  1. An old French coin consisting of 12 deniers.

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a contraction of the preposition so (under) + masculine singular article el (the).

Contraction[edit]

sol m

  1. under the

Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin sōl (sun).

Proper noun[edit]

sol m

  1. (astronomy) the Sun

Noun[edit]

sol m (plural sols)

  1. (astronomy) a sun
  2. (money) sol (unit of currency used by Peru)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

sol m (plural sols)

  1. (music) sol (the fifth note of the diatonic scale)

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowing from English sol.

Noun[edit]

sol m (plural sols)

  1. (chemistry) sol (a colloid suspension of a solid in a liquid)

Etymology 4[edit]

From Latin sōlus (solitary).

Adjective[edit]

sol m (feminine sola, masculine plural sols, feminine plural soles)

  1. alone
  2. unique

Etymology 5[edit]

Verb[edit]

sol

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of soler
  2. second-person singular imperative form of soler

Crimean Tatar[edit]

Noun[edit]

sol

  1. left

Declension[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sol

  1. left

References[edit]


Czech[edit]

Verb[edit]

sol

  1. second-person singular imperative of solit

Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia da

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse sól (sun), from Proto-Indo-European *sóh₂wl̥.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /soːl/, [soːˀl]

Noun[edit]

sol c (singular definite solen, plural indefinite sole)

  1. sun
Inflection[edit]

Verb[edit]

sol

  1. Imperative of sole.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin solūtiō (solution).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /soːl/, [soːˀl]

Noun[edit]

sol c (singular definite solen, plural indefinite soler)

  1. (chemistry) sol (solution)
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Latin sol(ve) in the hymn for St. John the Baptist.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sol n (singular definite sollet, plural indefinite soller)

  1. (music) sol (note)
Inflection[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sol(ve) in the hymn for St. John the Baptist all note names were taken from.

Noun[edit]

sol f (plural sollen, diminutive solletje n)

  1. (music, Belgium) sol, the fifth step in the solfège scale of C, preceded by fa and followed by la.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowing from Latin solum (soil, ground, floor).

Noun[edit]

sol m (plural sols)

  1. soil, earth
  2. ground
  3. floor
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin sol(ve) in the hymn for St. John the Baptist all note names were take from.

Noun[edit]

sol m (plural sol)

  1. (music) sol, the fifth step (G) in the solfège scale of C, preceded by fa and followed by la.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Spanish sol (sun), itself from Latin.

Noun[edit]

sol m (plural sols)

  1. A Spanish-American gold or silver coin, now the main currency unit of Peru (also new sol), or a coin of this value.

Etymology 4[edit]

From Latin solidus, a Roman coin

Noun[edit]

sol m (plural sols)

  1. (archaic) sou, the feudal era coin.

External links[edit]


Galician[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin sōl (sun), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *sóh₂wl̥.

Noun[edit]

sol m (plural soles)

  1. sun
  2. sunlight
  3. sunny side (of a place)
    quítate do sol
    go away from sunny side
  4. daylight (time between sunrise and sunset)
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

sol m (plural soles)

  1. (music) sol (musical note)
  2. (music) G (the musical note or key)

See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowing from English sol.

Noun[edit]

sol m (plural soles)

  1. (chemistry) sol (a colloid suspension of a solid in a liquid)

Indonesian[edit]

Noun[edit]

sol

  1. sole (of the foot)

Interlingua[edit]

Noun[edit]

sol (plural sols)

  1. sun

Adjective[edit]

sol (comparative plus sol, superlative le plus sol)

  1. alone

Determiner[edit]

sol

  1. (quantifying) only

Derived terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia it

Noun[edit]

sol m (invariable)

  1. sol (musical note, colloid)
  2. G (musical note and key)
  3. apocopic form of sole

Kurdish[edit]

Noun[edit]

sol f

  1. shoe

Ladino[edit]

Noun[edit]

sol m (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling סול)

  1. sun

Latin[edit]

sōl (the sun)

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic, from pre-Italic *sh₂wōl, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *sóh₂wl̥. Cognate with Old English sōl, Old Norse sól, Gothic 𐍃𐌰𐌿𐌹𐌻 (sauil), Old Church Slavonic слъньцє (slŭnĭce), Ancient Greek ἥλιος (hḗlios), Sanskrit सूर (sūra).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sōl m (genitive sōlis); third declension

  1. sun
    • (Can we date this quote?) Pliny the Younger, Epistulae, book 5
      Inde etiam rosas effert, umbrarumque frigus non ingrato sole distinguit. Finito vario illo multiplicique curvamine recto limiti redditur nec huic uni, nam viae plures intercedentibus buxis dividuntur.
      Farther on, there are roses too along the path, and the cool shade is pleasantly alternated with sunshine. Having passed through these manifold winding alleys, the path resumes a straight course, and at the same time divides into several tracks, separated by box hedges.[1][2]
      Even roses grow there, and the warmth of the sun is delightful as a change from the cool of the shade. When you come to the end of these various winding alleys, the boundary again runs straight, or should I say boundaries, for there are a number of paths with box shrubs between them.[3]

Declension[edit]

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative sōl sōlēs
genitive sōlis sōlum
dative sōlī sōlibus
accusative sōlem sōlēs
ablative sōle sōlibus
vocative sōl sōlēs

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pliny text, English translation 1
  2. ^ Pliny text, English translation 2
  3. ^ Pliny text, alternative English translation

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

sol

  1. rafsi of solri.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sól.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /suːl/
  • (Many eastern and northern dialects) IPA(key): [suːɽ]

Noun[edit]

sol f, m (definite singular sola or solen, indefinite plural soler, definite plural solene)

  1. sun
    Solen skinner.
    The sun shines.

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sól.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /suːl/
  • (Many eastern and northern dialects) IPA(key): [suːɽ]

Noun[edit]

sol f (definite singular sola, indefinite plural soler, definite plural solene)

  1. sun
    Sola skin i dag.
    The sun shines today.

Derived terms[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *sōwulą, *sōwulō (sun), from Proto-Indo-European *sewol-. Akin to Proto-Germanic *sunnǭ (sun), from Proto-Indo-European *suwen- (sun). Akin to Old Norse sól, Gothic 𐍃𐌰𐌿𐌹𐌻 (sauil, sun), Old English sunne, Old Norse, Old Saxon and Old High German sunna (sun).

Noun[edit]

sōl n

  1. sun
  2. the Sun
Synonyms[edit]
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *sulą (mud, spot), from Proto-Indo-European *sūl- (thick liquid). Cognate with Old High German sol, gisol (pool of excrement), Middle Dutch sol (puddle, dirt, filth). More at soil.

Noun[edit]

sol n

  1. mud, wet sand, mire
  2. a wallowing-place, slough, miry-place
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sol

  1. dark, dirty, soiled

Old Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin sōlus (alone).

Adverb[edit]

sol

  1. only; just; no more than
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin sōlem (sun), from Proto-Indo-European *sóh₂wl̥ (sun).

Noun[edit]

sol m

  1. sun
    • 13th century, attributed to Alfonso X of Castile, Cantigas de Santa Maria, To codex, cantiga 423 (facsimile):
      Eſta primeira é de comel fez ó çeo. ⁊ á terra. ⁊ ó mar ⁊ o ſol. ⁊ á lũa. ⁊ as eſtrelas ⁊ todalas outras couſas q̇ ſon. ⁊ como fez ó ome áſa ſemellança
      This first one is (about) how He made the heaven, and the earth, and the sea, and the sun, and the moon, and the stars, and everything else that exists. And how (He) made man in His own likeness.
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

sol

  1. third-person singular present indicative of soer

Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pt

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Portuguese sol, from Latin sōl (sun), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *sóh₂wl̥.

Noun[edit]

sol m (plural sóis)

  1. sun

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin solve in the hymn for St. John the Baptist.

Noun[edit]

sol m (plural sóis)

  1. sol (musical note)

Romanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin solum (base, bottom; soil).

Noun[edit]

sol

  1. The lowest part of something; bottom, ground, base, foundation, bed.
  2. The floor or pavement of a room.
  3. Ground, earth, land, soil.
  4. (gymnastics) An event performed on a floor-like carpeted surface.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Slavic solŭ, compare Slovene sel.

Noun[edit]

sol m (plural soli)

  1. messenger
  2. envoy
Declension[edit]

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Bosnian, Serbian):

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *solь, from Proto-Indo-European *séh₂l-, *séh₂ls.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sȏl f (Cyrillic spelling со̑л)

  1. (Croatia) salt

Declension[edit]


Slovene[edit]

Slovene Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia sl

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *solь, from Proto-Indo-European *séh₂l-, *séh₂ls.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sól f (genitive solí, nominative plural solí)

  1. salt (common substance)

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin sōl (sun), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *sóh₂wl̥.

Noun[edit]

sol m (plural soles)

  1. sun
  2. sunlight
  3. sunny side (of a place)
    quítate del sol
    go away from sunny side
  4. daylight (time between sunrise and sunset)
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin solve in the hymn for St. John the Baptist.

Noun[edit]

sol m (uncountable)

  1. sol (musical note)

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowing from English sol.

Noun[edit]

sol m (plural soles)

  1. (chemistry) sol (a colloid suspension of a solid in a liquid)

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sol c

  1. sun
  2. (by extension) a star, especially when one considers things in its surroundings.

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From English shoulder.

Noun[edit]

sol

  1. (anatomy) shoulder

Etymology 2[edit]

From English salt.

Noun[edit]

sol

  1. salt
Derived terms[edit]

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Turkic sol, from Proto-Turkic *sōl.

Noun[edit]

sol (definite accusative solu, plural sollar)

  1. left

Antonyms[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

sol

  1. sun