suka

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See also: sukā, su̇ka, sūkā, and сука

Fijian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English sugar, from later Old French çucre (circa 13th cent), from Medieval Latin zuccarum, from Old Italian zucchero, from Arabic سُكَّر (sukkar), from Persian شکر (šakar), from Sanskrit शर्करा (śárkarā, ground or candied sugar", originally "grit, gravel), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱorkeh- (gravel, boulder), akin to Ancient Greek κρόκη (krókē, pebble).

Noun[edit]

suka

  1. sugar

Finnish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

suka

  1. A brush, especially one used for brushing animals.
  2. currycomb

Declension[edit]

Inflection of suka (Kotus type 9/kala, k- gradation)
nominative suka suat
genitive suan sukojen
partitive sukaa sukoja
illative sukaan sukoihin
singular plural
nominative suka suat
accusative nom.? suka suat
gen. suan
genitive suan sukojen
sukainrare
partitive sukaa sukoja
inessive suassa suoissa
elative suasta suoista
illative sukaan sukoihin
adessive sualla suoilla
ablative sualta suoilta
allative sualleˣ suoilleˣ
essive sukana sukoina
translative suaksi suoiksi
instructive suoin
abessive suatta suoitta
comitative sukoineen

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Noun[edit]

suka

  1. pleasure

Verb[edit]

suka

  1. like
    Dia suka musik pop.
    She loves pop music.
  2. love
  3. (colloquial) frequently
    Aku suka pergi ke sana seminggu sekali.
    I used to go there once a week.

Synonyms[edit]


Latvian[edit]

Matu suka
Zobu suka

Etymology[edit]

There are competing theories on the origin of this word. The first (and more probable) one assumes that it comes from Proto-Indo-European *su- (pig) > derived form *suk- “pig” (masc., fem.), “coarse hair, bristle” (neut.). Originally suka was the neuter plural form, but it became feminine singular after the general loss of the neuter gender, with semantic change “bristles” > “brush” (compare German Bürste (brush), Borste (bristle)). Borrowings by Balto-Fennic languages from Baltic languages support this evolution (e.g., Finnish suka (pig bristle (archaic), currycomb)). The second theory considers suka cognate to Lithuanian šùkos (brush), щётка (ščotka, brush), Sanskrit शूकः (śūkaḥ, needle), all from Proto-Indo-European *ḱū- (pointed). A third theory attributes these words to Proto-Indo-European *kes-, *ks- (to cut, to carve).[1]

Noun[edit]

suka f (4th declension)

  1. brush (instrument made with flexible bristles attached to a handle, used especially for grooming hair)
    drēbju, apavu suka — clothes, shoe brush
    matu suka — hairbrush
    zobu suka — toothbrush
    zirgu suka — horse brush, currycomb
    saru, tērauda suka — bristle, steel brush
    tīrīt drēbes ar suku — to clean (one's) clothes with a brush

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “suka” in Konstantīns Karulis (1992, 2001), Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca, in 2 vols, Rīga: AVOTS, ISBN 9984-700-12-7

Malay[edit]

Verb[edit]

suka

  1. to like

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic (compare Russian сука (súka)), ultimately from a derivative of Proto-Indo-European *ḱwṓ. Sense #3 from an association with pies (dog, slang: cop).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

suka f

  1. bitch (female dog)
  2. (offensive) bitch
    May be used as an offensive term without a suggestion of promiscuity, but rather as a pushy, domineering person.
  3. (slang) police van

Declension[edit]


Quechua[edit]

Noun[edit]

suka

  1. furrow
  2. whistle, whistling noise

Declension[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

Not to be confused with suk'a, sukha.

See also[edit]


Slovak[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sǫkа, ultimately from a derivative of Proto-Indo-European *ḱwṓ.

Noun[edit]

suka f (genitive singular suky, nominative plural suky, declension pattern of žena)

  1. bitch

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • suka in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

Swahili[edit]

Verb[edit]

suka

  1. to shake

Tagalog[edit]

Etymology[edit]

compare cuka

Noun[edit]

suka

  1. vinegar

Verb[edit]

suka

  1. to vomit